encomium


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en·co·mi·um

 (ĕn-kō′mē-əm)
n. pl. en·co·mi·ums or en·co·mi·a (-mē-ə)
1. Warm, glowing praise.
2. A formal expression of praise.

[Latin encōmium, from Greek enkōmion (epos), (speech) praising a victor, neuter of enkōmios, of the victory procession : en-, in; see en-2 + kōmos, celebration.]

encomium

(ɛnˈkəʊmɪəm)
n, pl -miums or -mia (-mɪə)
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a formal expression of praise; eulogy; panegyric
[C16: from Latin, from Greek enkōmion, from en-2 + kōmos festivity]

en•co•mi•um

(ɛnˈkoʊ mi əm)

n., pl. -mi•ums, -mi•a (-mi ə)
a usu. formal expression of high praise; eulogy.
[1580–90; < Latin < Greek enkṓmion=en- en-2 + kôm(os) a revel + -ion n. suffix]

encomium

formal praise; an elaborate or ceremonial panegyric or eulogy. — encomiast, n.encomiastic, adj.
See also: Praise
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encomium - a formal expression of praise
congratulations, extolment, kudos, praise - an expression of approval and commendation; "he always appreciated praise for his work"

encomium

noun
Translations
chvalořečeníchvalozpěv
kunnianosoitusylistysylistyspuhe

encomium

[ɪnˈkəʊmɪəm] N (encomiums or encomia (pl)) [ɪnˈkəʊmɪə]elogio m, encomio m

encomium

n (form)Lobrede f, → Laudatio f (geh)
References in classic literature ?
This part of the existing hymn ends with an encomium of the Delian festival of Apollo and of the Delian choirs.
When he had enumerated the many different occasions on which the Hurons had exhibited their courage and prowess, in the punishment of insults, he digressed in a high encomium on the virtue of wisdom.
He then launched forth into a panegyric on Allworthy's goodness; into the highest encomiums on his friendship; and concluded by saying, he should never forgive his brother for having put the place which he bore in that friendship to a hazard.
Dear Madam [I wrote], It has come to my knowledge that when you walk in the Gardens with the boy David you listen avidly for encomiums of him and of your fanciful dressing of him by passers-by, storing them in your heart the while you make vain pretence to regard them not: wherefore lest you be swollen by these very small things I, who now know David both by day and by night, am minded to compare him and Porthos the one with the other, both in this matter and in other matters of graver account.
This great prince received me at my landing with all possible encomiums, and created me a NARDAC upon the spot, which is the highest title of honour among them.
Yet, having intimated that her appearance was peculiar, as being unlike that of her Flemish companions, I have little more to say respecting it; I can pronounce no encomiums on her beauty, for she was not beautiful; nor offer condolence on her plainness, for neither was she plain; a careworn character of forehead, and a corresponding moulding of the mouth, struck me with a sentiment resembling surprise, but these traits would probably have passed unnoticed by any less crotchety observer.
The piece was large; and it must be owned he did not spare his colours; for which my wife gave him great encomiums.
And truly, her companion justified the encomiums of the faithful chum.
Krempe was not equally docile; and in my condition at that time, of almost insupportable sensitiveness, his harsh blunt encomiums gave me even more pain than the benevolent approbation of M.
Accordingly, when Mr Groves had smoked his pipe out, knocked out the ashes, and placed it carefully in a corner of the fire-place, with the bowl downwards, he brought in the bread and cheese, and beer, with many high encomiums upon their excellence, and bade his guests fall to, and make themselves at home.
Though I plead guilty to some foolish palpitations of the heart during our headlong rush over the causeway here constructed, yet it were unjust to withhold the highest encomiums on the boldness of its original conception and the ingenuity of those who executed it.
And as a remedy for this fatal evil he is everywhere peculiarly emphatical in his encomiums on the habeas corpus act, which in one place he calls "the BULWARK of the British Constitution.