encyclopaedist


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Related to encyclopaedist: embarkation, heading, unallocated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.encyclopaedist - a person who compiles information for encyclopedias
compiler - a person who compiles information (as for reference purposes)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

encyclopaedist

encyclopedist [enˌsaɪkləʊˈpiːdɪst] Nenciclopedista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
The Karlovy Vary International Film Festival (KVIFF) will honour MiloEi Fikejz, respected Czech film expert in Czech, Slovak, and world cinema, columnist, librarian, encyclopaedist, and photographer who lost the fight against leukaemia this year.
Niaz Fatehpuri's Encyclopaedist ability cannot be denied, but he was neither the Voltaire nor Rousseau of his time.
Al-Farabi earned the nickname "Mallim-e-Sani," translated as "second master" or "second teacher." Al-Farabi contributed considerably to science, philosophy, logic, sociology, medicine, mathematics and music, but his major contribution occurred in the sphere of philosophy, logic and sociology, for which he stands out as an encyclopaedist. With regards to the cosmopolitan role of Otrar and of Al-Farabi's legacy, the author left a beautiful testimony of intercultural communication and cultural interaction when he wrote the following lines: "We have an opportunity to liaise with all peoples whose physical properties, food and lifestyle are normal...
(2) The Roman encyclopaedist Pliny the Elder, who devoted Book 34 of his Natural History to bronze, reports the claim that there were 3,000 Greek bronzes at Rhodes, and as many at Athens, Olympia and Delphi.
The remarkable Vincenzo Coronelli (16501718), encyclopaedist, geographer, inventor and Doctor of Theology, was citizen of the Republic of Venice.
This way of thinking, as Chateau notes, invites comparison with the Encyclopaedist philosophers.
Aulus Cornelius Celsus (25 BC-50 AD), a Roman encyclopaedist, has mentioned about this treatment in his extant medical work De Medicina.8 Cassius in 3 AD interpreted that since this disorder is related to puberty, it is known by the name of 'akmas'.9 In the 4th century AD, the court physician of Theodosius advised acne victims to wipe their "pimples" with a cloth while watching a falling star and the pimples would then 'fall from the body'.4 Pliny and Celsus, used the word 'varus' to elucidate this ailment.
(6) Other writers in this line assert that the genre is best where it "debunks totality, highlighting a contemporary shift to fragmentation" (van Ewijk, "Encyclopedia" 220) or depicts "the encyclopaedist's despair over the impossibility of attaining to perfect knowledge" (Clark, Fictional Encyclopedia 37).
Pacioli was the greatest encyclopaedist of the Renaissance in the context of this new mathematics and also in the context of Venice which, in the 15th century was the New York of the world and its Rialto was the Wall Street.
The greatest philosopher Al-Farabi was a Muslim; the greatest mathematicians Abul Kamil and Ibrahim Ibn Sinan were Muslims; the greatest geographer and encyclopaedist Al-Masudi was a Muslim; the greatest historian, Al-Tabari was still a Muslim." The Oxford History of Technology sums it up as follows: "There are few major technological innovations between 500 A.D.
The Iranian philosopher also stands out as an Encyclopaedist.
I was fascinated to hear the 72-year Venezuelan explorer Charles Brewer Carias describe himself as an encyclopaedist rather than a specialist (I'm a geographer, December 2010).