encyclopedic

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en·cy·clo·pe·dic

 (ĕn-sī′klə-pē′dĭk)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or characteristic of an encyclopedia.
2. Embracing many subjects; comprehensive: "an ignorance almost as encyclopedic as his erudition" (William James).

en·cy′clo·pe′di·cal·ly adv.

encyclopedic

(ɛnˌsaɪkləʊˈpiːdɪk) or

encyclopaedic

adj
1. (Library Science & Bibliography) of, characteristic of, or relating to an encyclopedia
2. covering a wide range of knowledge; comprehensive
enˌcycloˈpedically, enˌcycloˈpaedically adv

en•cy•clo•pe•dic

or en•cy•clo•pae•dic

(ɛnˌsaɪ kləˈpi dɪk)

adj.
1. pertaining to or of the nature of an encyclopedia; relating to all branches of knowledge.
2. embracing a wide variety of information; comprehensive.
[1815–25]
en•cy`clo•pe′di•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.encyclopedic - broad in scope or content; "encyclopedic knowledge"
comprehensive - including all or everything; "comprehensive coverage"; "a comprehensive history of the revolution"; "a comprehensive survey"; "a comprehensive education"

encyclopedic

adjective comprehensive, full, complete, vast, universal, wide-ranging, thorough, in-depth, exhaustive, all-inclusive, all-embracing, all-encompassing, thoroughgoing He has an encyclopedic knowledge of 80s popular music.
Translations
مَوْسوعي
encyklopedický
enciklopedijski
enciklopédikus
encyklopedisk

encyclopedic

[ɪnˌsaɪkləˈpiːdɪk] encyclopaedic (British) adj (= comprehensive) [knowledge] → encyclopédique

encyclop(a)edic

encyclopedic

encyclopaedic [ɪnˌsaɪkləʊˈpiːdɪk] adjenciclopedico/a

encyclop(a)edia

(insaikləˈpiːdiə) noun
a reference work containing information on every branch of knowledge, or on one particular branch. an encyclopaedia of jazz; If you do not know the capital city of Hungary, look it up in an encyclopaedia.
enˌcycloˈp(a)edic adjective
References in periodicals archive ?
Therefore: the act content of hope is, as a consciously illuminated, knowingly elucidated content, the positive utopian function; the historical content of hope, first represented in ideas, encyclopedically explored in real judgements, in human culture referred to its concrete-utopian horizon.
This unflinchingly argued, encyclopedically footnoted book became the foundation of all of my graduate women's studies teaching, particularly the capstone course.
Central Asian philosophical thought and natural science of IX- XII centuries represented by such bright encyclopedically educated thinkers as al- Beruni, al-Farabi, Avicenna, ar-Raziis considered to contribute great in XIV-XVI cc.
This is not fiction indeed, but a body of knowledge she has to appropriate and master, almost in an encyclopedic mode (just like the Latin denominations of plants and flowers that Linneaus spent his life encoding encyclopedically) to master and to push forward the seriousness and the universal directionality of her quest.
By scouring the advertisements in Readex's digitized Early American Newspapers series, Peter Benes has encyclopedically identified and tracked hundreds of entrepreneurs who travelled across what is now the United States selling services and experiences related to what Benes calls "popular culture."
The goal of the editors is not to encompass Hughes' work encyclopedically, but rather to offer the reader focused investigations on the aspects of his intellectual and personal biography that establish his significance for the discipline.
These encyclopedically arranged volumes provide biographical information for more than 350 influential people in the music industry, including "Early Life," "Life's Work," Personal Information," and "Further Reading" for each.
What holds his encyclopedically referenced, genre-blurring book together is the unmistakable honesty and intensity of his voice.
But any account that stresses Prince's solitary inventiveness misses the other crucial wellspring, as captured in the slogan of the long-standing free-jazz group the Art Ensemble of Chicago: "Great Black Music, Ancient to the Future." Prince's creativity is less cryptic if you imagine him ever buoyed on the tide of African American brilliance that came before, which he knew encyclopedically. (Of course, rock music is black music, too.) As his life and times advanced, his 1980s crossover moves seemed in retrospect like a feint, like calculated camouflage (early on, he even claimed falsely to be biracial).
James Quandt's visual essay "Jacques Demy, A-Z" traces some of the persistent tropes, themes, and influences in Demy's work, sometimes too quickly but, as the title indicates, encyclopedically. Substantial interviews with Demy scholars Rodney Hill and Marie Colmant contextualize Demy's work in unique ways (and their full-length commentaries for Umbrellas and Young Girls would have been most welcome).
As Joseph Francese (1997: 17) states in Narrating Postmodern Time and Space, Calvino's "faith in the capability of reason to encyclopedically embrace the knowable caused him to place the subject at the center of all experience".
Armed with StimAEs encyclopedically and alphabetically organized volume one can learn: how to write a contract or contract provision; the key requirements of any contract, such as a clear and definite offer with an unqualified acceptance; what particular contract term means; how to make sure you can enforce important business and personal agreements down the road.