endocast


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Related to endocast: Endocranial cast

en·do·cast

 (ĕn′də-kăst′)
n.
2. A cast or impression of the interior of a cavity.

endocast

(ˈɛndəʊˌkɑːst)
n
a short form of endocranial cast
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8 million years ago, a skull had filled with sediment inside a cave, and the sandstone solidified, leaving the impression that a brain leaves on the inside of a skull Quarry operations at Taung blasted through the filled-in cave, leaving most of the skull behind, but keeping the endocast intact.
Allosaurus, crocodiles, and birds: evolution clues from spiral computed tomography of an endocast.
Nonetheless, for many years, Broca's area was highlighted in any discussion of the evolution of language, because a well-defined, enlarged (and hence modern-like) Broca's area can be relatively securely identified on the surface of a fossil brain endocast (see discussion below).
Falk compared a cast of the cranium's inner surface, or endocast, obtained from the partial hobbit skeleton LB1 with endocasts from modern humans and from other fossil skulls in the human evolutionary, or hominid, family.
Scientists used computer tomography (CT) scans of the creature's skull to create a three dimensional virtual model of the surface of its brain, called an endocast.
Following partial decomposition and erosion, fragments of the rind and seeds were left attached to a soft endocast of mud.
Falk compared a cast of the cranium's inner surface, or endocast, obtained from the partial hobbit skeleton LB1 to endocasts from both modern humans and from other fossil skulls in the human evolutionary family, called hominids for short.
After rotting and erosion of the rind, fragments of rind and many seeds were left attached to a soft endocast of mud.
For instance, a cast of the cranium's inner surface -- known as an endocast -- taken from the brain case of a 2-million-year-old H.
These endocasts approximated the size and shape of brains contained within the braincases, and as Homo sapiens evolved over time, the researchers found a gradual change from an elongated endocranial shape to the more roundish one we have today.
A number of Norell's current and former students and postdoctoral researchers are using this technique to compare the endocasts of extinct dinosaurs to the brains of modern birds in order to explore the evolution of the so-called "bird brain.