peptide

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pep·tide

 (pĕp′tīd′)
n.
Any of various natural or synthetic compounds containing two or more amino acids joined by peptide bonds that link the carboxyl group of one amino acid to the amino group of another.


pep·tid′ic (-tĭd′ĭk) adj.
pep·tid′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

peptide

(ˈpɛptaɪd)
n
(Elements & Compounds) any of a group of compounds consisting of two or more amino acids linked by chemical bonding between their respective carboxyl and amino groups. See also peptide bond, polypeptide
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

pep•tide

(ˈpɛp taɪd)

n.
a compound containing two or more amino acids in which the carboxyl group of one acid is linked to the amino group of the other.
[1905–10; pept (ic) + -ide]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

pep·tide

(pĕp′tīd′)
A chemical compound that is composed of a chain of two or more amino acids and is usually smaller than a protein. Some hormones and antibiotics are peptides.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.peptide - amide combining the amino group of one amino acid with the carboxyl group of another; usually obtained by partial hydrolysis of protein
amide - any organic compound containing the group -CONH2
fibrinopeptide - peptide released from the amino end of fibrinogen by the action of thrombin to form fibrin during clotting of the blood
polypeptide - a peptide containing 10 to more than 100 amino acids
endorphin - a neurochemical occurring naturally in the brain and having analgesic properties
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

peptide

[ˈpɛptaɪd]
npeptide m
modif
peptide bond → liaison f peptidique
peptide chain → chaîne f peptidique
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

peptide

[ˈpɛptaɪd] npeptide m
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
Stress-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is seen in both diseases with the resultant release of corti-cotropin releasing factor (CRF) and dynorphin, an endogenous opioid peptide (Figure 1(a)).
Endogenous opioid peptide (EOP) decrease pain and studies have found that consumption of sweet ingesta increases endogenous opioid peptide (EOP) activity in rat brain, plasma and cerebral spinal fluid, (12) and also human plasma.
Dynorphin is an endogenous opioid peptide with a high affinity for the kappa-opioid receptor and its up-regulation in the spinal cord coincide whit an elevation in pain thresholds in rats during pregnancy and parturition (BRADSHAW et al., 2000).
Some in vivo and in vitro studies show that the endogenous opioid peptide (morphine) inhibits the reproductive function acting via the CNS.
The endogenous opioid peptide family pronociceptin system is comprised of peptides that are derived from pro-hormone, which act on opioid receptorlike receptors (ORL).
ENK are produced from a propeptide precursor, proenkephalin (proENK), which is translated from preproenkephalin mRNA that is encoded by a gene distinct from the other endogenous opioid peptides [19, 20].
Acupuncture related to the release of endogenous opioid peptides (enkephalin, beta-endorphin and dynorphin) from the central nervous system, and opioids are known to increase dopaminergic neuron activity in the mesolimbic brain region [7, 8].
Once activated by agonists, such as morphine or endogenous opioid peptides, they lead to the inhibition of adenylate cyclase and reduction of cAMP synthesis [5].