sac

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Sac

 (săk, sôk)
n.
Variant of Sauk.

SAC

abbr.
Strategic Air Command

sac 1

 (săk)
n.
A pouch or pouchlike structure in an organism, sometimes filled with fluid.

[French, bag, from Old French, from Latin saccus; see sack1.]

sac 2

 (săk)
n. Baseball
1. A sacrifice fly. Also called sac fly.
2. A sacrifice bunt. Also called sac bunt.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

sac

(sæk)
n
(Biology) a pouch, bag, or pouchlike part in an animal or plant
[C18: from French, from Latin saccus; see sack1]
ˈsacˌlike adj

SAC

(in Britain) abbreviation for
(Environmental Science) Special Area of Conservation
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sac

(sæk)

n.
a baglike structure in an animal, plant, or fungus, esp. one containing fluid.
[1735–45; < Latin saccus sack1]
sac′like`, adj.

Sac

(sæk, sɔk)

n., pl. Sacs, (esp. collectively) Sac.

SAC

(sæk)
n.
Strategic Air Command.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

sac

(săk)
A bag-like bag in an animal or plant, often containing liquids. The human bladder is a sac.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sac - an enclosed spacesac - an enclosed space; "the trapped miners found a pocket of air"
enclosed space, cavity - space that is surrounded by something
2.sac - a case or sheath especially a pollen sac or moss capsule
covering, natural covering, cover - a natural object that covers or envelops; "under a covering of dust"; "the fox was flushed from its cover"
3.sac - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living in Wisconsin in the Fox River valley and on the shores of Green BaySac - a member of the Algonquian people formerly living in Wisconsin in the Fox River valley and on the shores of Green Bay
Algonquian, Algonquin - a member of any of the North American Indian groups speaking an Algonquian language and originally living in the subarctic regions of eastern Canada; many Algonquian tribes migrated south into the woodlands from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic coast
4.sac - a structure resembling a bag in an animal
yolk sac - membranous structure enclosing the yolk of eggs in birds, reptiles, marsupials, and some fishes; circulates nutrients to the developing embryo
umbilical vesicle, vesicula umbilicus, vitelline sac, yolk sac - membranous structure that functions as the circulatory system in mammalian embryos until the heart becomes functional
amnion, amnios, amniotic sac - thin innermost membranous sac enclosing the developing embryo of higher vertebrates (reptiles, birds and mammals)
chorion - the outermost membranous sac enclosing the embryo in higher vertebrates (reptiles, birds and mammals)
coelenteron - the saclike body cavity of a coelenterate
air bladder, swim bladder, float - an air-filled sac near the spinal column in many fishes that helps maintain buoyancy
air sac - any of the membranous air-filled extensions of the lungs of birds
air sac - any of the thin-walled extensions of the tracheae of insects
bodily cavity, cavum, cavity - (anatomy) a natural hollow or sinus within the body
saccule, sacculus - a small sac or pouch (especially the smaller chamber of the membranous labyrinth)
bladder, vesica - a distensible membranous sac (usually containing liquid or gas)
acinus - one of the small sacs or saclike dilations in a compound gland
bursa - a small fluid-filled sac located between movable parts of the body especially at joints
cistern, cisterna - a sac or cavity containing fluid especially lymph or cerebrospinal fluid
pouch, pocket - (anatomy) saclike structure in any of various animals (as a marsupial or gopher or pelican)
vesicle, cyst - a small anatomically normal sac or bladderlike structure (especially one containing fluid)
air cell, air sac, alveolus - a tiny sac for holding air in the lungs; formed by the terminal dilation of tiny air passageways
pericardial sac - the membrane surrounding the heart
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

sac

noun pouch, bag, pocket, bladder, pod, cyst, bursa, vesicle The lungs consist of millions of tiny air sacs.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002
Translations

sac

[sæk] N (Anat, Bio) → saco m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

sac

[ˈsæk] n (ANATOMY)sac m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

sac

n (Anat) → Sack m; (= pollen sac)Staubbeutel m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

sac

[sæk] n (Anat) → sacco
honey sac → cestella (del polline)
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

sac

n. saco, bolsa; estructura u órgano en forma de saco o bolsa.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

sac

n (anat) saco
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Paraganglioma, (52,53) schwannoma, (54) meningioma, (54) and endolymphatic sac tumor (55) may be multifocal/bilateral, raising the possibility of familial or syndromic association, and requiring appropriate clinical investigation or confirmation.
However, many treatment options are offered by clinicians; some of which include dietary modifications, medical management with diuretics, steroids or betahistine, and surgeries, such as decompression of the endolymphatic sac [13].
The doctor may remove some of the bone around the inner ear (endolymphatic sac decompression), drain the inner ear fluid through a tube (endolymphatic shunt), cutting the nerve for balance (vestibular neurectomy) and the ultimate removing the inner ear (labyrinthectomy).
They cover otosclerosis surgery; chronic ear disease surgery; canalplasty; cholesterol granuloma; cerebral spinal fluid leaks, encephalocele,or pseudo-meningocele; posterior fossa tumor surgery; glomus tumors; hypoglossal foramen and foreman magnum tumors; endolymphatic sac tumors; carcinoma involving the temporal bone; implantable middle ear devices; cochlear implant surgery; auditory brainstem implant; surgery for Meniere disease; repair of superior semicircular canal dehiscence; surgery for benign positional postural vertigo; facial decompression; and facial nerve repair and facial palsy rehabilitation.
However, other lesions like glomus tumor, melanoma, mucosal adenoma, fibrous dysplasia, squamous cell carcinoma, adenoma of the endolymphatic sac, encephalocele, and tuberculosis were reported in the remaining patients.
No lymphocytes are present in the normal endolymphatic sac, and there is no evidence that the lymphocytes present in the cochlea during the immune response are derived from the endolymphatic sac; thus, they must originate mainly from the peripheral circulatory system [40].
(4) Endolymphatic sac tumors, papillary cystadenomas of the epididymis or broad ligament, or neuroendocrine tumors of the pancreas-less common
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), especially on T2-weighted images, allows visualization of the membranous labyrinth [13, 14, 19] and is the only imaging technique that enables visualization of the extraosseous portion of the endolymphatic sac. Three-dimensional reconstructions from MRI data sets are often helpful in detecting the sac and other inner ear structures and to better define their morphological features, so that MRI is considered superior to CT in EVA evaluation by some authors [20, 21].
Endolymphatic sac tumours (ELST) occur in 11-16% of VHL patients.
The endolymphatic sac is believed to regulate endolymphatic pressure, fluid volume, and ionic balance within the inner ear.
Furthermore, ELH can be found in autoimmune inner ear disease, posttraumatic ears, otosyphilis, otosclerosis, endolymphatic sac tumors, and other disorders [20].
Surgery on the endolymphatic sac is of questionable value.