adenocarcinoma

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ad·e·no·car·ci·no·ma

 (ăd′n-ō-kär′sə-nō′mə)
n.
A malignant tumor originating in glandular tissue.

ad′e·no·car′ci·nom′a·tous (-nŏm′ə-təs, -nō′mə-təs) adj.

adenocarcinoma

(ˌædɪnəʊˌkɑːsɪˈnəʊmə)
n, pl -mas or -mata (-mətə)
1. (Pathology) a malignant tumour originating in glandular tissue
2. (Pathology) a malignant tumour with a glandlike structure

ad•e•no•car•ci•no•ma

(ˌæd n oʊˌkɑr səˈnoʊ mə)

n., pl. -mas, -ma•ta (-mə tə)
1. a malignant tumor arising from secretory epithelium.
2. a malignant tumor of glandlike structure.
[1885–90]
ad`e•no•car`ci•nom′a•tous (-ˈnɒm ə təs, -ˈnoʊ mə-) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.adenocarcinoma - malignant tumor originating in glandular epitheliumadenocarcinoma - malignant tumor originating in glandular epithelium
carcinoma - any malignant tumor derived from epithelial tissue; one of the four major types of cancer
prostate cancer, prostatic adenocarcinoma - cancer of the prostate gland
Translations

ad·e·no·car·ci·no·ma

n. adenocarcinoma, cáncer maligno que se origina en una glándula.

adenocarcinoma

n adenocarcinoma m
References in periodicals archive ?
Differentiating endocervical ADC from uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma may be very difficult in a biopsy or curettage specimen.
Subtypes of endometrial cancer include the more common type I, endometrioid adenocarcinoma, and the rare type II, which encompasses clear-cell, carcinosarcomas, and endometrial serous carcinoma.
Utility of a novel Serum tumor biomarker HE4 in patients with endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the uterus.
This nonblinded, randomized controlled multicenter equivalency trial included 760 women from Australia, New Zealand, and Hong Kong undergoing surgical management of presumed stage I uterine endometrioid adenocarcinoma.
Most common malignant tumour reported was endometrioid adenocarcinoma.
Paraaortic LN dissection was added to pelvic LN dissection in patients with at least one of the following risk factors: a) non-endometrioid histology, b) grade 2 or 3 endometrioid adenocarcinoma, c) deep ([greater than or equal to]50%) myometrial invasion on intraoperative frozen-section examination.
Furthermore, synchronous or metachronous occurrence of atypical hyperplasia or endometrioid adenocarcinoma within APA has been reported.
Epithelioid angiosarcoma of the bladder after irradiation for endometrioid adenocarcinoma.
Serous cystadenocarcinomas, mucinous cystadenocarcinomas and endometrioid adenocarcinoma constituted the commonest malignant subtype in the surface epithelial group which is similar to the present study.
73%) while endometrioid adenocarcinoma (n=9/10, 90%) was the most common uterine carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma was the most common cervical carcinoma (n=7/9, 77.
Endometrial carcinomas can be further classified by histology as endometrioid adenocarcinoma, serous adenocarcinoma, clear cell adenocarcinoma, mixed cell carcinoma, mucinous adenocarcinoma, metaplastic carcinoma (carcinosarcoma), squamous cell carcinoma, transitional cell carcinoma, small cell carcinoma, undifferentiated carcinoma, and others (4).