fibrosis

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fi·bro·sis

 (fī-brō′sĭs)
n.
The formation of excessive fibrous tissue, as in a reparative or reactive process.

fi·brot′ic (-brŏt′ĭk) adj.

fibrosis

(faɪˈbrəʊsɪs)
n
(Pathology) the formation of an abnormal amount of fibrous tissue in an organ or part as the result of inflammation, irritation, or healing
fibrotic adj

fi•bro•sis

(faɪˈbroʊ sɪs)

n.
the development in an organ of excess fibrous connective tissue.
[1870–75]
fi•brot′ic (-ˈbrɒt ɪk) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fibrosis - development of excess fibrous connective tissue in an organ
pneumoconiosis, pneumonoconiosis - chronic respiratory disease caused by inhaling metallic or mineral particles
cystic fibrosis, fibrocystic disease of the pancreas, mucoviscidosis, pancreatic fibrosis, CF - the most common congenital disease; the child's lungs and intestines and pancreas become clogged with thick mucus; caused by defect in a single gene; no cure is known
pathology - any deviation from a healthy or normal condition
myelofibrosis - fibrosis of the bone marrow
Translations

fibrosis

[faɪˈbrəʊsɪs] nfibrosi f

fi·bro·sis

n. fibrosis, formación anormal de tejido fibroso;
diffuse interstitial pulmonary ______ intersticial del pulmón;
proliferative ______ proliferativa;
retroperineal ______ retroperineal.

fibrosis

n fibrosis f; idiopathic pulmonary — fibrosis pulmonar idiopática; nephrogenic systemic — fibrosis sistémica nefrogénica
References in periodicals archive ?
Endomyocardial fibrosis is a sequel of vasculitis that involves the endocardium, myocardium, or both, and has a tendency toward bacterial endocarditis or intraventricular thrombosis.
Although Africa is seeing a rise in lifestyle-associated atherosclerosis and other conditions common in the developed world, there are also large numbers of people suffering from chronic heart conditions with infectious origins, including rheumatic heart disease arising from streptococcal infection, endomyocardial fibrosis, and tuberculous pericarditis.