endorphin


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en·dor·phin

 (ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
n.
Any of a group of peptide hormones that bind to opioid receptors and act as neurotransmitters. Endorphins reduce the sensation of pain and affect emotions.

[endo(genous) + (mo)rphin(e).]

endorphin

(ɛnˈdɔːfɪn)
n
(Biochemistry) any of a class of polypeptides, including enkephalin, occurring naturally in the brain, that bind to pain receptors and so block pain sensation
[C20: from endo- + morphine]

en•dor•phin

(ɛnˈdɔr fɪn)

n.
any of a group of peptides, resembling opiates, that are released in the body in response to stress or trauma and that react with the brain's opiate receptors to reduce the sensation of pain.
[1970–75; end(ogenous) (m)orphine]

en·dor·phin

(ĕn-dôr′fĭn)
Any of a group of substances found in the nervous system, especially in the brain, that regulate the body's response to pain and other stimuli.
Did You Know? In the 1970s, scientists began to wonder why drugs like morphine could kill pain so effectively. Researchers knew that morphine attached to specific body molecules called receptors, so they reasoned that these receptors probably existed because the body itself had natural painkilling compounds that also bonded to those receptors. They searched and finally found proteins called endorphins, a word that combines endogenous, meaning "naturally occurring within the body," and morphine. When your body is under stress, it can produce endorphins so that you can still function under what would otherwise be exceptionally painful conditions. Many long-distance runners, for example, claim that after they run for a while they start to feel exceptionally happy, a condition sometimes called a runner's high. High levels of endorphins in response to the strain of running seem to be responsible for this state of mind.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.endorphin - a neurochemical occurring naturally in the brain and having analgesic properties
peptide - amide combining the amino group of one amino acid with the carboxyl group of another; usually obtained by partial hydrolysis of protein
neurochemical - any organic substance that occurs in neural activity
beta endorphin - an endorphin produced by the pituitary gland that suppresses pain
enkephalin - an endorphin having opiate qualities that occurs in the brain and spinal cord and elsewhere
Translations

endorphin

[ˌenˈdɔːfɪn] Nendorfina f

endorphin

nEndorphin nt

endorphin

n endorfina
References in periodicals archive ?
While exercising, your body releases chemicals called endorphins. These endorphins interact with the receptors in your brain that reduce your perception of pain.
Just like all exercise, laughter yoga can help to reduce stress because it boosts endorphins and gets your heart rate up, and is also mixed with some meditation to really help you hit "pause", check in with yourself, your body and let go.
Dark chocolate contains the antioxidant resveratol, which increases endorphins (an opiate) and serotonin (a mood elevator) in the brain, releasing feelings of happiness.
His Craving Cure Questionnaire scores clearly indicated that his endorphin function was weak.
Increased levels endorphin activity in the brain also correlated with the runners' self-reported feelings of euphoria.
endorphins extremely We found ourselves in TK Maxx, but the only bag we found that might be suitable was what is variably called a manbag or messenger bag.
As greater endorphin activity in the brain is linked to higher pain tolerance, each participant was asked to squat with their back against a wall and their knees at right-angles to their body - a simple but uncomfortable exercise.
Although not conclusively demonstrated, studies suggest this mood-enhancing benefit may be mediated by the sun's ability to stimulate the synthesis of endorphins in the skin.
Remember a time you had a release of endorphins - making love, laughing, or another moment of euphoria when you tingled with pleasure.
Q: I've recently been running and often hear about a so-called "runner's high" that has to do with endorphins. What is this?
Summary: TEHRAN (FNA)- Drinking alcohol leads to the release of endorphins in areas of the brain that produce feelings of pleasure and reward, according to a new study.