endorsation

endorsation

(ˌɛndɔːˈseɪʃən) or

indorsation

n
Canadian approval or support
References in periodicals archive ?
Wallace's response was unenthusiastic but indicated a relatively liberal attitude towards academic freedom: "This is a matter about which there is no question of authorisation or endorsation from the University standpoint.
Beyond these crucial themes the reader is given a list of 12 time-buying steps to combat climate change and an endorsation of eco-socialism.
Martin makes no apology for his unqualified endorsation of the policies of the Liberal party.
What he means is that, leaving the Quebecois aside, Canadians have a shared minimum common denominator which is support for a civic association, best symbolized by our endorsation of the 1982 Charter.
After the Master Plan received endorsation in principle by the Canadian National Exhibition Association and "enthusiastic support" from the Metropolitan Toronto Board of Trade, it was reviewed by the Metropolitan Toronto Council Parks and Recreation Committee.
From the mad sectarianism of the Third Period which would aid Hitler's rise to power, to the endorsation of the Moscow Trials and mass purges of thousands of loyal Communists later on, to the defence of the Hitler-Stalin Pact, the American Communists followed every twist and turn of Soviet policy.
Nobody predicted mass public endorsation of Jean Charest as Daniel Johnson's replacement.
This ringing endorsation of free speech is somewhat problematic--first of all, it ignores the fact that Fromm remained employed even after the disciplinary action had been taken.
The election was undoubtedly an unequivocal endorsation by the citizens of that stand.
More disturbing is the endorsation of the accord by the Canadian Labour Congress.
As a consequence, of all the gentlemen alleged to have the endorsation of the labor party, only one -- Mr.
Freeman's leadership should not be seen as an endorsation of the "Great Man" theory of history.