endosymbiont


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en·do·sym·bi·ont

 (ĕn′dō-sĭm′bē-ŏnt′, -bī-)
n.
An organism living inside another organism in an endosymbiotic relationship.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

endosymbiont

(ˌɛndəʊˈsɪmbɪˌɒnt)
n
(Biology) an organism living symbiotically inside the cells or body of another
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
Translations
endosymbiote
References in periodicals archive ?
The bacterium (Sodalis glossinidius) is an endosymbiont, similar to the "good bacteria" which populate human intestines, found in tsetse fly midgut, muscle, fat and salivary glands.
In Brazil, they are probably carriers of bacteria (LISE et al., 2006, FERRABOLI et al., 2007; BICHO et al., 2007; MAIA et al., 2009; SANTOS et al., 2009; TEIXEIRA et al., 2009), fungi (PEREIRA; UENO, 2008; PANTOJA et al., 2009), endosymbiont bacteria, eggs of Ascaris, and cysts of protists (VILLANI et al., 2008).
Ultrastructure of a marine dinoflagellate, Peridinium quinquecorne Abe (Peridiniales) from South Africa with particular reference to its chrysophyte endosymbiont. Bot.
* identify an unknown nucleotide sequence from an insect endosymbiont using the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) search tool BLAST.
Digital calipers (accurate to 0.01 mm) were used to measure the diameter of endosymbiont shafts in thin sections.
Isolation of Wuchereria bancrofti microfilariae from archived stained blood slides for use in genetic studies and amplification of parasite and endosymbiont genes.
Blanco Y, Blanch M, Pinon D, Legaz ME, Vicente C (2005) Antagonism of Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus (a sugarcane endosymbiont) against Xanthomonas albilineans (pathogen) studied in alginate-immobilized sugarcane stalk tissues.
Future work will be directed towards identifying the phenotypes caused by individual bacteria, and in determining the selective advantage that the phenotype confers, and studying the consequence of co-infection with more than one endosymbiont. Spiders are a particularly well-suited group (see Goodacre et al.
Infection and co-infection rates of Anaplasma phagocytophylum variants, Babesia spp., Borrelia burgdorferi, and the rickettsial endosymbiont in Ixodes scapularis (Acari: Ixodidae) from sites in Indiana, Maine, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.
falciparum the FAS-II system (PfFAS-II) takes place in the apicoplast, a previously discovered chloroplast-like organelle (McFadden et al., 1996), which is thought to have arisen from an ancient cyanobacterial endosymbiont through the process of secondary endosymbiosis (Williams and Keeling, 2003).
The origin of the more complicated eukaryotic cell type has been partially elucidated by the now widely-accepted endosymbiont theory, which posits that two of the major membrane-bound compartments of eukaryotic cells--mitochondria, the energy-making organelles, and chloroplasts, the organelles where photosynthesis occurs in plant cells--were formed from ancient bacteria that invaded the cytoplasm of an ancient proto-eukaryotic cell and eventually took up residence in that cell.