calorie

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Related to Energy Expenditure: Basal energy expenditure, Total Energy Expenditure

cal·o·rie

 (kăl′ə-rē)
n.
1. Abbr. cal Any of several approximately equal units of heat, each measured as the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C at 1 atmosphere pressure. Also called gram calorie, small calorie.
2. Abbr. cal The unit of heat equal to 1/100 the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water from 0 to 100°C at 1 atmosphere pressure. Also called mean calorie.
3.
a. Abbr. Cal The unit of heat equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 kilogram of water by 1°C at 1 atmosphere pressure. Also called kilocalorie, kilogram calorie, large calorie.
b. A unit of energy-producing potential equal to this amount of heat that is contained in food and released upon oxidation by the body. Also called nutritionist's calorie.

[French, from Latin calor, heat; see caloric.]

calorie

(ˈkælərɪ) or

calory

n, pl -ries
(Units) a unit of heat, equal to 4.1868 joules (International Table calorie): formerly defined as the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C under standard conditions. It has now largely been replaced by the joule for scientific purposes. Abbreviation: cal Also called: gram calorie or small calorie Compare Calorie
[C19: from French, from Latin calor heat]

Calorie

(ˈkælərɪ)
n
1. (Units) Also called: kilogram calorie, kilocalorie or large calorie a unit of heat, equal to one thousand calories, often used to express the heat output of an organism or the energy value of food. Abbreviation: Cal
2. (Units) the amount of a specific food capable of producing one thousand calories of energy

cal•o•rie

or cal•o•ry

(ˈkæl ə ri)
n., pl. -ries.
1.
a. Also called gram calorie, small calorie. an amount of heat exactly equal to 4.1840 joules.Abbr.: cal
b. (usu. cap.) kilocalorie. Abbr.: Cal
2.
a. a unit equal to the kilocalorie, expressing the heat output of an organism and the energy value of food.
b. a quantity of food capable of producing such an amount of energy.
[1800–10; < French < Latin calor heat]

cal·o·rie

(kăl′ə-rē)
1. A unit of heat equal to the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of one gram of water by one degree Celsius. Also called small calorie.
2.
a. A unit of heat equal to the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1,000 grams of water by one degree Celsius. Also called kilocalorie, large calorie.
b. This unit used as a measure of the amount of heat energy released by food as it is digested by the body.

Calorie

1. A calorie is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of a gram of water by 1°C. A Calorie (kilocalorie) is 1000 calories.
2. (cal) A measure of heat energy representing the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature 1 g of water by 1°C. Also called “small calorie”: 1000 cal = 1 kcal or Cal. See joule, kilocalorie.
3. A calorie (c) is the amount of heat needed to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1°C. A Calorie (C) is a kilocalorie, or 1000 calories (c). The energy content of foods is usually given in Calories (kilocalories).
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.Calorie - a unit of heat equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree at one atmosphere pressure; used by nutritionists to characterize the energy-producing potential in food
energy unit, heat unit, work unit - a unit of measurement for work
gram calorie, small calorie, calorie - unit of heat defined as the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree centigrade at atmospheric pressure
2.calorie - unit of heat defined as the quantity of heat required to raise the temperature of 1 gram of water by 1 degree centigrade at atmospheric pressure
energy unit, heat unit, work unit - a unit of measurement for work
Calorie, kilocalorie, kilogram calorie, large calorie, nutritionist's calorie - a unit of heat equal to the amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one kilogram of water by one degree at one atmosphere pressure; used by nutritionists to characterize the energy-producing potential in food
Translations
سُعر حراري، وِحْدَه حَراريَّهسُعْرَةوِحْدَه حَراريَّه، كالوري
kalorie
kalorie
kalori
kalorija
kalória
hitaeining, kaloríakaloría, hitaeining
カロリー
칼로리
kalorijakaloringas
kalorija
kalória
kalorija
kalori
หน่วยพลังความร้อน
calo

calorie

[ˈkælərɪ] Ncaloría f
she's very calorie-consciouses muy cuidadosa con la línea
a calorie-controlled dietun régimen de bajo contenido calórico

calorie

[ˈkæləri] ncalorie f

calorie

nKalorie f; low on calorieskalorienarm

calorie

in cpdsKalorien-, kalorien-;
calorie-conscious

calorie

[ˈkælərɪ] ncaloria
low-calorie product → prodotto a basso contenuto calorico

calorie

(ˈkӕləri) noun
(abbreviated to cal when written).
1. a unit of heat.
2. a unit of energy given by food. My diet allows me 1,200 calories per day.
ˌcaloˈrific adjective

calorie

سُعْرَة kalorie kalorie Kalorie θερμίδα caloría kalori calorie kalorija caloria カロリー 칼로리 calorie kalori kaloria caloria калория kalori หน่วยพลังความร้อน kalori calo 卡路里

cal·o·rie

n. caloría, unidad de calor a la que se refiere al evaluar la energía alimenticia;
kilocalorie, large ___gran ___;
small ___pequeña ___.

calorie

n caloría
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