enflesh

enflesh

(ɪnˈflɛʃ)
vb (tr)
1. to grow flesh or give a flesh-like form to
2. to ingrain
References in periodicals archive ?
Programs such as Landings, a Paulist national ministry to returning Catholics, help to "enflesh the human welcoming, the empathetic side of the church," Sullivan remarks.
Bishop Richard Pates of Des Moines, Iowa, penned an essay on Catholics' political involvement that does not adopt a cultural-warrior mode but instead challenges serious Catholics to ask themselves whether they are willing to wink at the ways our chosen political parties fail to grasp and enflesh the robust moral vision of the church.
To borrow another metaphor from Christian tradition, these are poems in which words body forth or enflesh the seemingly abstract beliefs that characterize a Christian disposition toward the world and, thus, invite readers hungry for spiritual and aesthetic sustenance to participate in a linguistic version of the Eucharistic feast.
We rejoice to be part of this Franciscan community that strengthens and empowers us to deepen and celebrate our 0th; to enflesh the ideals and spirit of Francis among our families, friends, and those with whom we work; to work for peace with justice by being advocates for the poor and oppressed wherever they may be.
Ending her talk during the Columbus visit by referencing the story in Ezekiel of the valley of dry bones, Campbell said it's the task of Catholics to enflesh God's word.
It is easy to see how this conception of reproduction as an individual or personal act would follow from postmodern or post-Christian conceptions of freedom: here the freedom to reproduce is the liberty to enflesh one's own desires, to enact one's conception of the future.
Shawn Copeland puts it, both the bishops and people of faith must "enflesh freedom" by the way wfe\live.
In written etic discourse, which is, after all, a linear string of syntagms, one may need to 'break off in order to 'enflesh' a character...." I'll confess I have nev er used "discourse" as a verb.
Where human beings fight evil and injustice and remain in hopeful solidarity with one another, they enflesh the image of the God who remains, holding the sufferer's hand--as God remained through Jesus' felt abandonment upon the cross.
In her wounds we see God's refusal to remain aloof from creation--apathetic, unmoved, uncaring--just insofar as God decided to enflesh herself in all of the processes and lifeforms that constitute life as we know it.
Why did God choose to enflesh God's own self among us in such an ambiguous manner?
It was something they could envision, put words to, enflesh with hard toil.