engine


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to engine: search engine

en·gine

 (ĕn′jĭn)
n.
1.
a. A machine that converts energy into mechanical force or motion.
b. Such a machine distinguished from an electric, spring-driven, or hydraulic motor by its use of a fuel.
2.
a. A mechanical appliance, instrument, or tool: engines of war.
b. An agent, instrument, or means of accomplishment.
3. A locomotive.
4. A fire engine.
5. Computers A search engine.
tr.v. en·gined, en·gin·ing, en·gines
To equip with an engine or engines.

[Middle English engin, skill, machine, from Old French, innate ability, from Latin ingenium; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

engine

(ˈɛndʒɪn)
n
1. (Mechanical Engineering) any machine designed to convert energy, esp heat energy, into mechanical work: a steam engine; a petrol engine.
2. (Railways)
a. a railway locomotive
b. (as modifier): the engine cab.
3. (Military) military any of various pieces of equipment formerly used in warfare, such as a battering ram or gun
4. obsolete any instrument or device: engines of torture.
[C13: from Old French engin, from Latin ingenium nature, talent, ingenious contrivance, from in-2 + -genium, related to gignere to beget, produce]

en•gine

(ˈɛn dʒən)

n.
1. a machine for converting thermal energy into mechanical energy or power to produce force and motion.
2. a railroad locomotive.
4. any mechanical contrivance.
5. a machine or instrument used in warfare, as a battering ram, catapult, or piece of artillery.
6. Obs. an instrument of torture.
[1250–1300; Middle English engin < Old French < Latin ingenium nature, innate quality, especially mental power, hence a clever invention]
en′gined, adj.
en′gine•less, adj.

en·gine

(ĕn′jĭn)
A machine that turns energy into mechanical force or motion, especially one that gets its energy from a source of heat, such as the burning of a fuel. See more at internal-combustion engine, jet engine, steam engine.

machine

motorengine
1. 'machine'

A machine is a piece of equipment which uses electricity or some other form of power to perform a particular task.

...a washing machine.
I put the coin in the machine and pulled the lever.
2. 'motor'

When a machine operates by electricity, you refer to the part of the machine that converts power into movement as the motor.

...a malfunctioning fan motor in the attic space of the building.
3. 'engine'

You do not use 'machine' to refer to the part of a vehicle that provides the power that makes the vehicle move. This part of a car, bus, lorry, or plane is usually called the engine.

He couldn't get his engine started.
The starboard engines were already running.

You talk about the engine of a ship, but the motor of a small boat.

Black smoke belched from the engine into the cabin.
We patched leaks, overhauled the motor, and refitted her.

engine

A device converting one form of energy into another, especially mechanical energy.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.engine - motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical workengine - motor that converts thermal energy to mechanical work
aircraft engine - the engine that powers and aircraft
automobile engine - the engine that propels an automobile
auxiliary engine, donkey engine - (nautical) a small engine (as one used on board ships to operate a windlass)
camshaft - has cams attached to it
gearing, geartrain, power train, gear, train - wheelwork consisting of a connected set of rotating gears by which force is transmitted or motion or torque is changed; "the fool got his tie caught in the geartrain"
generator - engine that converts mechanical energy into electrical energy by electromagnetic induction
heat engine - any engine that makes use of heat to do work
motor - machine that converts other forms of energy into mechanical energy and so imparts motion
reaction engine, reaction-propulsion engine - a jet or rocket engine based on a form of aerodynamic propulsion in which the vehicle emits a high-speed stream
2.engine - something used to achieve a purpose; "an engine of change"
causal agency, causal agent, cause - any entity that produces an effect or is responsible for events or results
3.engine - a wheeled vehicle consisting of a self-propelled engine that is used to draw trains along railway tracksengine - a wheeled vehicle consisting of a self-propelled engine that is used to draw trains along railway tracks
choo-choo - a child's word for locomotive
diesel locomotive - a locomotive driven by a diesel engine
dinkey, dinky - a small locomotive
electric locomotive - a locomotive that is powered by an electric motor
cowcatcher, fender, buffer, pilot - an inclined metal frame at the front of a locomotive to clear the track
footplate - the platform in the cab of a locomotive on which the engineer stands to operate the controls
iron horse - (c. 1840) an early term for a locomotive
pilot engine - a locomotive that precedes a train to check the track
self-propelled vehicle - a wheeled vehicle that carries in itself a means of propulsion
shunter - a small locomotive used to move cars around but not to make trips
steam locomotive - a locomotive powered by a steam engine
donkey engine, switch engine - a locomotive for switching rolling stock in a railroad yard
tank engine, tank locomotive - a locomotive that carries its own fuel and water; no tender is needed
traction engine - steam-powered locomotive for drawing heavy loads along surfaces other than tracks
railroad train, train - public transport provided by a line of railway cars coupled together and drawn by a locomotive; "express trains don't stop at Princeton Junction"
4.engine - an instrument or machine that is used in warfare, such as a battering ram, catapult, artillery piece, etc.; "medieval engines of war"
battering ram - a ram used to break down doors of fortified buildings
arbalest, arbalist, ballista, bricole, mangonel, onager, trebuchet, trebucket, catapult - an engine that provided medieval artillery used during sieges; a heavy war engine for hurling large stones and other missiles
instrument - a device that requires skill for proper use

engine

noun machine, motor, mechanism, generator, dynamo He got into the driving seat and started the engine.
Translations
مُحَرِّكمُحَرِّك القِطار
lokomotivamotor
lokomotivmotor
moottoriveturi
motorlokomotiva
járnbrautarlest; eimreiîvél, hreyfill
エンジン機関車
엔진
garvežysinžinerijainžinieriusinžinierius mechanikaskelių inžinierius
motorsdzinējslokomotīve
motor
lokomotivamotor
motorloklokomotiv
เครื่องยนต์หัวรถจักร
động cơ

engine

[ˈendʒɪn]
A. N
1. (= motor) (in car, ship, plane) → motor m
2. (Rail) → locomotora f, máquina f
facing the enginede frente a la máquina
with your back to the enginede espaldas a la máquina
B. CPD engine block N (Aut) → bloque m del motor
engine driver N (Brit) [of train] → maquinista mf
engine failure Navería f del motor
engine room N (Naut) → sala f de máquinas
engine shed N (Brit) (Rail) → cochera f de tren
engine trouble N = engine failure

engine

[ˈɛndʒɪn]
n
[vehicle] → moteur m
(= locomotive) → locomotive f
modif (AUTOMOBILES) [noise, problem] → de moteur; [size] → du moteurengine driver n (British) [train] → mécanicien/ienne m/f

engine

n
Maschine f; (of car, plane etc)Motor m; (of ship)Maschine f
(Rail) → Lokomotive f, → Lok f
(Comput: = search engine) → Suchmaschine f

engine

:
engine block
nMotorblock m
engine compartment
nMotorraum m

engine

:
engine mountings
plMotoraufhängung f
engine oil
nMotoröl nt
engine room
n (Naut) → Maschinenraum m
engine shed
n (Brit) → Lokomotivschuppen m

engine

[ˈɛndʒɪn] n (motor, in car, ship, plane) → motore m (Rail) → locomotiva
facing/with your back to the engine → nel senso della/in senso contrario alla marcia
front-to-back engine (Aut) → motore longitudinale

engine

(ˈendʒin) noun
1. a machine in which heat or other energy is used to produce motion. The car has a new engine.
2. a railway engine. He likes to sit in a seat facing the engine.
ˈengine-driver noun
a person who drives a railway engine.
ˌengiˈneer noun
1. a person who designs, makes, or works with, machinery. an electrical engineer.
2. (usually civil engineer) a person who designs, constructs, or maintains roads, railways, bridges, sewers etc.
3. an officer who manages a ship's engines.
4. (American) an engine-driver.
verb
to arrange by skill or by cunning means. He engineered my promotion.
ˌengiˈneering noun
the art or profession of an engineer. He is studying engineering at university.

engine

مُحَرِّك lokomotiva, motor lokomotiv, motor Lokomotive, Maschine μηχανή locomotora, motor moottori, veturi locomotive, moteur lokomotiva, motor motore エンジン, 機関車 엔진 locomotief, motor motor lokomotywa, silnik motor двигатель, локомотив motor เครื่องยนต์, หัวรถจักร motor động cơ 发动机, 火车头
References in classic literature ?
Somewhere in the distance, off to the west, there was a prolonged blast from the whistle of a passenger engine.
Small as it was, this uncommon engine had excited the curiosity of most of the Europeans in the camp, though several of the provincials were seen to handle it, not only without fear, but with the utmost familiarity.
The signal was given; the engine puffed forth its short, quick breaths; the train began its movement; and, along with a hundred other passengers, these two unwonted travellers sped onward like the wind.
In Hester Prynne's instance, however, as not unfrequently in other cases, her sentence bore that she should stand a certain time upon the platform, but without undergoing that gripe about the neck and confinement of the head, the proneness to which was the most devilish characteristic of this ugly engine.
His body shakes and throbs like a runaway steam engine, and the ear cannot follow the flying showers of notes--there is a pale blue mist where you look to see his bowing arm.
The bell rung, the steamer whizzed, the engine groaned and coughed, and away swept the boat down the river.
There are three railway-tracks; the central one is cogged; the "lantern wheel" of the engine grips its way along these cogs, and pulls the train up the hill or retards its motion on the down trip.
The fireboys were never on hand so suddenly before; for there was no distance to go this time, their quarters being in the rear end of the market house, There was an engine company and a hook-and-ladder company.
Stryver shouldered his way through the law, like some great engine forcing itself through turbid water, and dragged his useful friend in his wake, like a boat towed astern.
Also the chimney on fire, the parish engine, and perjury on the part of the Beadle.
That I had a fever and was avoided, that I suffered greatly, that I often lost my reason, that the time seemed interminable, that I confounded impossible existences with my own identity; that I was a brick in the house wall, and yet entreating to be released from the giddy place where the builders had set me; that I was a steel beam of a vast engine, clashing and whirling over a gulf, and yet that I implored in my own person to have the engine stopped, and my part in it hammered off; that I passed through these phases of disease, I know of my own remembrance, and did in some sort know at the time.
Five hundred carpenters and engineers were immediately set at work to prepare the greatest engine they had.