enjamb

enjamb

(ɪnˈdʒæm)
vb (intr)
obsolete to encroach
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References in periodicals archive ?
Pushkin could have begun the description of the painting in the first tercet, possibly eliminating the need to enjamb the two stanzas together.
Although I quote two first sentences that conclude conveniently at the end of the quatrain, Wakefield generally tends to enjamb his lines heavily, and the poems are printed without stanza breaks or the conventional majuscule to denote the start of lines, so that nearly all the poems take on the appearance of plain blocks of distilled colloquial talk.
Because most lines either endstop or enjamb on completed phrases rather than mid-phrase, we read at a measured pace.
At its best, the repositioning freshens; at times, though, the recycling involves stacking lines, as opposed to pairing ones that grammatically enjamb into each-other--an example is "upshift and the song asserts itself/tram or bus tram or bus tram or bus"--so that a fabric is woven, paralleling the line "weaving theopathy into the daily fabric," but the threads seem too loosely woven, too dependent on meaning purely by proximity not a more specific logic.
This enjambment is not overdone; the general pattern is to enjamb the first half-line, but to finish his thought in the second half-line.
This, McLaughlin argues, is the signature lament of Conrad's (and later also Eliot's) appraisal of the new urban situation, of a cosmopolitanism which, to these writers' eyes, does not so much enjamb cultural difference within the streets of the city as it erases any prospect of determinate localized identity.
The fictional Homer in the Contest must often wait until he hears the words that occupy the whole adonic at verse-end before he can know how to enjamb them.
Short, & as solemn as possible' - another emphasis on the Welsh context - then returns to recitative to enjamb III.
They demonstrated that it is possible to enjamb two consecutive A sections in Binchois's `Seule esgaree' and--a perennially thorny problem--in Okeghem's `Prennez sur moy', and deem it possible in 14 other Binchois chansons without reinterpreting the signum, and in 14 more in which the signum would need to be moved.
How does the address/apostrophe to Dorothy enjamb the "figured" and the "real"?
They can be whole in themselves, or can enjamb, or can accumulate.
This, against a more independent move to enjamb in some offbeat, deliberate way, to hold a note--so to speak--a little longer than usual for personal emphasis.