enmity

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en·mi·ty

 (ĕn′mĭ-tē)
n. pl. en·mi·ties
1. Deep-seated, often mutual hatred.
2. A feeling or state of hatred or animosity: "More than almost any public man I have ever met, he has avoided exciting personal enmities" (Theodore Roosevelt).

[Middle English enemite, from Old French enemistie, from Vulgar Latin *inimīcitās, from Latin inimīcus, enemy; see enemy.]
Synonyms: enmity, hostility, antagonism, animosity, animus, antipathy
These nouns refer to the feeling or expression of ill will toward another. Enmity is deep-seated hatred that seeks to oppose, harm, or defeat another: "He made a reality ... of what my Zaidy could not even allow himself to imagine—a life that warmed frigid blood, that melted solid walls of enmity built by war and poverty and cruelty" (Reesa Grushka).
Hostility is similar to enmity but often suggests an angry reaction or vigilant opposition: "The Court had demonstrated its hostility to affirmative action in several recent cases" (Mari Matsuda & Charles Lawrence III).
Antagonism often suggests mutual hostility: "The antagonism between business—especially big industrial business—and environmentalists appeared to be a war that would never end" (Lis Harris).
Animosity and animus connote visceral emotion: "Just beneath the surface of their civility ... lurked a powerful animosity between Johnson and Kennedy" (Nick Kotz)."The examination became a forum in which [he] could vent his animus against the administration" (Joseph A. McCartin).
Antipathy is deep-seated aversion or repugnance: a long-held antipathy to modern art.

enmity

(ˈɛnmɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
a feeling of hostility or ill will, as between enemies; antagonism
[C13: from Old French enemistié, from enemi enemy]

en•mi•ty

(ˈɛn mɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
a feeling or condition of hostility; hatred; ill will; animosity.
[1250–1300; Middle English enemite < Middle French; Old French enemiste < Vulgar Latin *inimīcitātem, acc. of *inimīcitās < Latin inimīc(us) enemy]

enmity

- "Hatred, ill will," the feelings of an enemy.
See also related terms for hatred.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enmity - a state of deep-seated ill-willenmity - a state of deep-seated ill-will  
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
latent hostility, tension - feelings of hostility that are not manifest; "he could sense her latent hostility to him"; "the diplomats' first concern was to reduce international tensions"
state of war, war - a legal state created by a declaration of war and ended by official declaration during which the international rules of war apply; "war was declared in November but actual fighting did not begin until the following spring"
cold war - a state of political hostility between countries using means short of armed warfare
suspicion - the state of being suspected; "he tried to shield me from suspicion"
2.enmity - the feeling of a hostile personenmity - the feeling of a hostile person; "he could no longer contain his hostility"
hate, hatred - the emotion of intense dislike; a feeling of dislike so strong that it demands action
animosity, animus, bad blood - a feeling of ill will arousing active hostility
class feeling - feelings of envy and resentment of one social or economic class for toward another
antagonism - an actively expressed feeling of dislike and hostility
aggression, aggressiveness - a feeling of hostility that arouses thoughts of attack
belligerence, belligerency - hostile or warlike attitude or nature
bitterness, rancor, rancour, resentment, gall - a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will

enmity

enmity

noun
Deep-seated hatred, as between longtime opponents or rivals:
Translations
عَداوَه، كَراهِيَه
fjendskabhaduvenskab
óvinátta
naidīgumsnaids
düşmanlık

enmity

[ˈenmɪtɪ] N (= hatred) → enemistad f

enmity

[ˈɛnmɪti] ninimitié f
enmity for sb → inimitié pour qn

enmity

nFeindschaft f

enmity

[ˈɛnmɪtɪ] ninimicizia

enmity

(ˈenməti) noun
unfriendliness; hatred.
References in classic literature ?
Dionysius also, for accusing Daphnseus and the rich, was thought worthy of being raised to a tyranny, from the confidence which the people had of his being a popular man in consequence of these enmities.
In many polished countries civil contentions, as well as domestic enmities, are prevalent, and the same time that the most atrocious foreign wars are waged.
The Prince," he said softly, "is faithful to his ancient enmities.
An attempt to fix the boundary between the regions of ability and inability, would much oftener give scope to personal and party attachments and enmities than advance the interests of justice or the public good.
Moreover there are no enmities so bitter that they cannot be washed away by blood, by a good sword-thrust loyally given.