enterococcus

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en·ter·o·coc·cus

 (ĕn′tə-rō-kŏk′əs)
n. pl. en·ter·o·coc·ci (-kŏk′sī′, -kŏk′ī′)
A usually nonpathogenic streptococcus that inhabits the intestine.

en′ter·o·coc′cal adj.

enterococcus

(ˌɛntərəʊˈkɒkəs)
n, pl -cocci (-ˈkɒkaɪ; US -ˈkɒksaɪ)
(Physiology) any of several streptococcus species present in the intestine
Translations
entérocoque

en·ter·o·coc·cus

n. enterococo, clase de estreptococo que se aloja en el intestino humano.

enterococcus

n (pl -ci) enterococo; vancomycin-resistant — enterococo resistente a (la) vancomicina
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References in periodicals archive ?
Intrinsic resistance: Enterococci exhibits intrinsic resistance to penicillinase-susceptible penicillin (low level), penicillinase-resistant penicillin, cephalosporin, nalidixic acid aminoglycoside and clindamycin (1).
Vancomycin-resistant Enterococci can colonise the bowel and can therefore be transmitted by direct contact with faeces.
Keywords: Escherichia coli, enterococci, bacteria, fecal coliforms, indicator, water quality, verification, false positive, pH, Alapahoochee River, Georgia
The number of vancomycin-resistant Enterococci has increased dramatically from 1.
It is known that 16 different species of enterococci can be found in coastal waters (Clesceri et al.
For each site, enterococci had been measured in samples taken daily or weekly for several years.
Particularly worrying is the increase in incidences of multidrug-resistant organisms such as the methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE).
As a consequence, the enterococci were placed in the genus Enterococcus.
Respiratory tract infections rarely result from enterococci.
To monitor sanitary water quality, periodic sampling and enterococci bacteria testing of the beaches' surf zone waters have been conducted since August 1997.
Vancomycin-resistant enterococci, or VRE, is one of several bacteria that are being seen with increasing frequency in hospitals and that are, at best, minimally responsive to antibiotics.
VRE rates have continued to increase and now account for more than 25 percent of ICU enterococci infections, according to the National Nosocomial (hospital acquired) Infections Surveillance system.