fistula

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fis·tu·la

(fĭs′chə-lə)
n. pl. fis·tu·las or fis·tu·lae (-lē′)
1. A duct or passage resulting from injury, disease, or a congenital disorder that connects an abscess, cavity, or hollow organ to the body surface or to another hollow organ.
2. Such a passage that has been created intentionally, especially a surgically constructed connection between an artery and a vein that is used for vascular access in hemodialysis.

[Middle English, from Latin, hollow stalk of a reed, pipe, fistula (in the medical sense, probably calqued on Greek surinx, panpipe, fistula); perhaps akin to Latin festūca, straw, stalk; see fescue.]

fistula

(ˈfɪstjʊlə)
n, pl -las or -lae (-ˌliː)
1. (Pathology) pathol an abnormal opening between one hollow organ and another or between a hollow organ and the surface of the skin, caused by ulceration, congenital malformation, etc
2. obsolete any musical wind instrument; a pipe
[C14: from Latin: pipe, tube, hollow reed, ulcer]

fis•tu•la

(ˈfɪs tʃʊ lə)

n., pl. -las, -lae (-ˌli)
1. Pathol. a narrow passage or duct formed by disease or injury.
2. a surgical opening into a hollow organ for drainage.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin: pipe, tube, fistula]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.fistula - a chronic inflammation of the withers of a horse
animal disease - a disease that typically does not affect human beings
2.fistula - an abnormal passage leading from a suppurating cavity to the body surfacefistula - an abnormal passage leading from a suppurating cavity to the body surface
passageway, passage - a path or channel or duct through or along which something may pass; "the nasal passages"
Translations

fistula

[ˈfɪstjʊlə] N (fistulas or fistulae (pl)) → fístula f

fistula

[ˈfɪstjʊlə] nfistola

fis·tu·la

n. fístula, canal o pasaje anormal que permite el paso de secreciones de una cavidad a otra o a la superficie exterior;
anal ______ anal;
arteriovenous ______ arteriovenosa;
biliary ______ biliar.

fistula

n (pl -las o -lae) fístula; anal — fístula anal; arteriovenous — fístula arteriovenosa; mucous — fístula mucosa
References in periodicals archive ?
Here, we report a case involving a chronic enterocutaneous fistula (ECF) for 24 months that was treated using hypertonic saline injection within the duodenal mucosa and use of fibrin glue as an adhesive to ensure rapid closure.
Enterocutaneous fistula in cases of postoperative adhesions was more commonly seen in cases where adhesiolysis was done than resection.
A total of 15 (15%) patients were kept on ATT under observation, Of these 7(7%) were diagnosed with Ileocaecal mass, 5 (5%) with enterocutaneous fistula, and 3(3%) had sub-acute intestinal obstruction.
Despite the fact that enterocutaneous fistula formation that occurs in strangulated cases is a rare complication, it might still occur in delayed and neglected cases (4).
17,18 Now a days intestinal obstruction and enterocutaneous fistula formation now seems to be subsiding, although debate persists.
Surgeons from the US, Europe, Israel, and Japan address communication and safety, ethical and legal implications, general principles, anesthesia, and surgeries for specific conditions and contexts, such as abdominal wall infection, abdominal compartment syndrome, hemorrhage, trauma, vascular surgery, intestinal anastomotic leak and enterocutaneous fistula, hernia, bariatric surgery, pancreatic surgery, liver surgery, biliary tract surgery, organ transplants, chronic inflammatory bowel disease, recurrent small bowel obstruction, complications of radiation injury and chemotherapy, and geriatric patients.
12] According to some data [9,13] suture failure, commonly lead to wound dehiscence and anastomotic leakage, leads to intra-abdominal abscesses or enterocutaneous fistula.
He is now having enterocutaneous fistula for which he is being treated conservatively.
During a routine wound review the following day, however, the presence of enteric material in the wound was noticed and it soon became apparent that an enterocutaneous fistula had developed (Figure 1), which immediately prompted a CT scan of the area; this revealed a round lesion medial to the right femoral vessels that was highly suspicious of a femoral hernia (Figure 2).
Permanent mesh materials provide excellent strength and durability but have potentially catastrophic complications including infection and enterocutaneous fistula development.
In theory, percutaneous drainage converts an intra-abdominal abscess (which is a contraindication to anti-TNF therapy) into an enterocutaneous fistula (which is an indication for anti-TNF therapy).
Enterocutaneous fistula complicating trauma: a major resourse burden.