enterovirus

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en·ter·o·vi·rus

 (ĕn′tə-rō-vī′rəs)
n. pl. en·ter·o·vi·rus·es
Any of a genus of picornaviruses, including polioviruses, coxsackieviruses, and echoviruses, that infect the gastrointestinal tract and often spread to other areas of the body, especially the nervous system.

en′ter·o·vi′ral adj.

enterovirus

(ˌɛntərəʊˈvaɪrəs)
n, pl -viruses
(Microbiology) any of a group of viruses that occur in and cause diseases of the gastrointestinal tract

en•ter•o•vi•rus

(ˌɛn tə roʊˈvaɪ rəs)

n., pl. -rus•es.
any of several picornaviruses of the genus Enterovirus, including poliovirus, that infect the human gastrointestinal tract and cause diseases of the nervous system.
[1955–60]
en`ter•o•vi′ral, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enterovirus - any of a group of picornaviruses that infect the gastrointestinal tract and can spread to other areas (especially the nervous system)
picornavirus - a group of single-strand RNA viruses with a protein coat
poliovirus - the virus causing poliomyelitis
hepatitis A virus - the virus causing hepatitis A
Coxsackie virus, coxsackievirus - enterovirus causing a disease resembling poliomyelitis but without paralysis
echovirus - any of a group of viruses associated with various diseases including viral meningitis and mild respiratory disorders and diarrhea in newborn infants
Translations

enterovirus

n. enterovirus, grupo de virus que infecta el tubo digestivo y que puede ocasionar enfermedades respiratorias y trastornos neurológicos.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two (25%) of 8 children who were positive for toxins died, whereas only 1 (5.3%) of the 19 children with enterovirus encephalitis died, but this difference was not significant (p>0.05).
When patients with TB were compared with patients with viral causes of encephalitis (Table), those with enterovirus encephalitis were significantly younger, were less likely to require intensive care, had shorter hospitalizations, had fewer abnormal results for CSF and neuroimaging, and were less likely to die (all p<0.05).