bone spur

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bone spur

n.
An abnormally occurring bony outgrowth, as on the heel or a spinal vertebra, that occurs as a result of osteoarthritis or chronic inflammation. Also called osteophyte.
References in periodicals archive ?
1.0 to 2.0 cm depth is all that is needed to visualize areas of the insertion of the Achilles paying particular attention to capturing the entire proximal to distal length of any enthesophyte. Interventions are performed dynamically, with the aid of real-time grey-scale and color Doppler imaging.
Plain radiographs of the pelvis may reveal enthesophyte formation in cases of chronic tendinopathy or bony avulsion in cases of acute injury.
Subsistence induced pathologies by individual (EA: Cases with auditory exostosis; CA: Number of external auditory canals; EH: Cases with humeral enthesophyte; HD: Number of distal epiphysis-humerus; SF: Cases with squatting facets; TD: Number of distal tibial epiphyses; NP: Not present; NR: Not recordable).
Anterior ankle impingement and talar bony outgrowths: osteophyte or enthesophyte? Paleopathologic and cadaveric study with imaging correlation.
If there's a calcification, spur, or enthesophyte at the insertion, we'll then go in and use the tip of an 18-gauge needle to chip off the enthesophytes and break them up," he said, adding that patients describe the procedure as a little like having their teeth cleaned.
An enthesophyte, or bone spur, may be seen at the insertion of the tendon onto the bone.
The images captured part of the skull, including the area where the bony projections, called enthesophytes, form at the back of the head.
The TT should therefore not be confused with enthesophytes on the proximal femur.
Acromial morphology: relation to sex, age, symmetry, and subacromial enthesophytes Radiology, 199(3) :737-42, 1996.
[20] Natsis K et al quoted that subacromial impingement syndrome and rotator cuff tears were common in Type III acromion due to presence of enthesophytes. [21] Collipol et al quoted that the acromion morphology according to Epstein et al appears to have a prediction value to determine the success of conservative medical treatment in some cases and the need for surgery in patients with joint impingement.
Patients with spondyloarthritis exhibit excessive bone formation followed by joint inflammation that can occur at entheses (enthesophytes), near joints on the periosteal surface (osteophytes), or in the spine (syndesmophytes).