enthrallment


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en·thrall

 (ĕn-thrôl′)
tr.v. en·thralled, en·thrall·ing, en·thralls
1. To hold spellbound; captivate: The magic show enthralled us.
2. To enslave.

[Middle English, to put in bondage : en-, causative pref.; see en-1 + thrall, slave; see thrall.]

en·thrall′ing·ly adv.
en·thrall′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enthrallment - a feeling of great liking for something wonderful and unusual
liking - a feeling of pleasure and enjoyment; "I've always had a liking for reading"; "she developed a liking for gin"

enthrallment

noun
Total occupation of the attention or of the mind:
References in periodicals archive ?
The enthrallment of Icarus is seen as a fatal distraction and relegated to a cautionary tale.
Since Jane's enthrallment is a response to these reasons, it is plausibly fitting.
It is a communion of emotions joy, peace, awe, enthrallment. It is a faith-lift experience mysterious, surreal and divine.
For a modern enthrallment, the tour could not be completed without visiting EL-Gouna in Hurghada.
Altogether, Eisler's three Heine settings critique three aspects of German socio-political affect: nationalist bluster, sentimental servility, and enthrallment to false authority.
However, by the end of the midsection his authoritative and professional concern for Michael gives way to a submissive enthrallment to him.
Our collective enthrallment with Noah's big day in Buffalo (the event's attendees couldn't arrange transportation to Grand Island itself) epitomizes our sometimes outsized eagerness to assign symbolic meaning and historical significance to Jewish American texts and experiences.
The strongest writing found in the Cambridge Companion and Beat Drama (and throughout Melehy's book) sets a standard of analysis that helps separate Beat scholarship from repetition of received wisdom or enthrallment to Beat myth.
Toward a conclusion, the works collectively indicate a shared enthrallment with the plants' seemingly miraculous ability to return from states of near-death, as visually signified by the withering and browning of foliage.
Her achievement lies in her ability to narrate a text that forces her to confront Enthrallment, she is as Angela Hall-Godsey says: "Jane is the power behind her own narrative" (Hall-Godsey, 2008: 44).
It occurred to me that perhaps their enthrallment with James Bond and the arrival of young, untrained volunteers bringing only good English and good intentions were part-and-parcel of the same thing: a blatant promotion of Western culture and Western values over their own.
She argues that what Austen "recognized with unparalleled clarity" was that "generalizations" like those employed by Richardson in Sir Charles Grandison (1753-54), "far from preventing, in fact promoted the reader's Galatean enthrallment to a Pygmalion-like author ..." (7).