enthymeme

(redirected from enthymematical)

en·thy·meme

 (ĕn′thə-mēm′)
n. Logic
A syllogism in which one of the premises or the conclusion is not stated explicitly.

[Latin enthȳmēma, from Greek enthūmēma, a rhetorical argument, from enthūmeisthai, to consider : en-, in; see en-2 + thūmos, mind.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

enthymeme

(ˈɛnθɪˌmiːm)
n
1. (Logic) an incomplete syllogism, in which one or more premises are unexpressed as their truth is considered to be self-evident
2. (Logic) any argument some of whose premises are omitted as obvious
[C16: via Latin from Greek enthumēma, from enthumeisthai to infer (literally: to have in the mind), from en-2 + thumos mind]
ˌenthymeˈmatic, ˌenthymeˈmatical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

en•thy•meme

(ˈɛn θəˌmim)

n.
a syllogism or other argument in which a premise or the conclusion is unexpressed.
[1580–90; < Latin enthȳmēma < Greek enthymēma thought, argument, derivative of enthȳmē-, variant s. of enthȳmeîsthai to ponder]
en`thy•me•mat′ic, adj.
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