entremets

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en·tre·mets

 (ŏn′trə-mā′, -mĕ′)
n. pl. en·tre·mets (-māz′, -mē′)
A side dish, such as a relish or dessert, served in addition to the principal course.

[Middle English entremetes, from Old French entremes, entremets : entre, between (from Latin inter; see inter-) + mes, mets, dish; see mess.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

entremets

(French ɑ̃trəmɛ)
n, pl -mets (French -mɛ)
1. (Cookery) a dessert
2. (Cookery) Also called: entremesse a light dish, formerly served at formal dinners between the main course and the dessert
[C18: from French, from Old French entremes, from entre- between, inter- + mes dish, mess]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

en•tre•mets

(ˌɑn trəˈmeɪ, ˌɑ̃-)

n., pl. -mets (-ˈmeɪz)
(used with a sing. or pl. v.)
a dish served between the main courses of a formal dinner or as a side dish.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Middle French; Old French entremes]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.entremets - a dish that is served with, but is subordinate to, a main course
dish - a particular item of prepared food; "she prepared a special dish for dinner"
meal, repast - the food served and eaten at one time
mushy peas - marrowfat peas that have been soaked overnight and then boiled; served with fish and chips
raita - an Indian side dish of yogurt and chopped cucumbers and spices
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(125-32) Out of the prese he went full esily To make stable his hevie countinaunce, And wote ye well he sighid wondirly For his sorowes and wofull remembrance, Then in hymself he made his ordinance, And forthwithall came to bryng in the messe, But for to judge his moste wofull penance God wote it was a pitous entremesse. (149-56) Keats's knight "Alone and palely loitering" (2) directly echoes the above description of the lover, "pale," "lene," "wofull," and "alone." The lover of the Middle English text is described as "ravished uttirly" (111) with a "hevie countinaunce" (150), his voice "tremblid" (128, also 112, 121-22), and he is prone to "sighyng wondir sore" (197, 151) and "wepyng" (218).