entrenched


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

en·trench

(ĕn-trĕnch′) also in·trench (ĭn-)
v. en·trenched, en·trench·ing, en·trench·es also in·trenched or in·trench·ing or in·trench·es
v.tr.
1. To provide with a trench, especially for the purpose of fortifying or defending.
2. To fix firmly or securely: "Today managed care plans are entrenched in the economy, enrolling 61 percent of the population" (Peter T. Kilborn).
v.intr.
1. To dig or occupy a trench.
2. To encroach, infringe, or trespass.

en·trench′ment n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.entrenched - dug in
invulnerable - immune to attack; impregnable; "gunners raked the beach from invulnerable positions on the cliffs"
2.entrenched - established firmly and securely; "the entrenched power of the nobility"
constituted, established - brought about or set up or accepted; especially long established; "the established social order"; "distrust the constituted authority"; "a team established as a member of a major league"; "enjoyed his prestige as an established writer"; "an established precedent"; "the established Church"

entrenched

intrenched
adjective fixed, set, firm, rooted, well-established, ingrained, deep-seated, deep-rooted, indelible, unshakable, ineradicable Japan's entrenched business practices

entrenched

adjective
Translations

entrenched

[ɪnˈtrentʃt] ADJ
1. (pej) (= established) [idea, belief, attitude] → arraigado; [position, power] → afianzado
deeply entrenched [idea, belief, attitude] → profundamente arraigado; [position, power] → firmemente afianzado
to be entrenched in the belief/view thatmantener obcecadamente la creencia/opinión de que ...
he's too entrenched in the pastestá demasiado anclado en el pasado
2. (Mil) → atrincherado

entrenched

[ɪnˈtrɛntʃt] adj [ideas, positions] → arrêté(e); [interests] → bien établi(e)
strongly entrenched → fermement enraciné(e)

entrenched

adj
(= established) positionunbeugsam; ideasfestgefügt; belief, attitudefest verwurzelt; interestsetabliert; power, bureaucracyetabliert, festgesetzt; behaviour, personinflexibel; deeply entrenched beliefs/prejudicestief verwurzelte Überzeugungen/Vorurteile pl; to be/become entrenched in something (word, custom)sich in etw (dat)eingebürgert haben/einbürgern; (idea, prejudice)sich in etw (dat)festgesetzt haben/festsetzen; (belief)in etw (dat)verwurzelt sein/sich in etw (dat)verwurzeln; you’re too entrenched in the pastSie sind zu sehr in der Vergangenheit verhaftet
(Mil) → eingegraben, verschanzt; to take up entrenched positionssich verschanzen

entrenched

[ɪnˈtrɛntʃt] adj (Mil) → trincerato/a (fig) → radicato/a
References in classic literature ?
Mahomet preserved his own life not without difficulty, but did not lose his capacity with the battle: he had still a great number of troops remaining, which he rallied, and entrenched himself at Membret, a place naturally strong, with an intention to pass the winter there, and wait for succours.
They therefore entrenched themselves on a hill over against the enemy's camp, and though victorious, were under great disadvantages.
Sometimes he remembered how he had heard that soldiers in war when entrenched under the enemy's fire, if they have nothing to do, try hard to find some occupation the more easily to bear the danger.
WHILE Norman of Torn and his thousand fighting men marched slowly south on the road toward Dover, the army of Simon de Montfort was preparing for its advance upon Lewes, where King Henry, with his son Prince Edward, and his brother, Prince Richard, King of the Romans, together with the latter's son, were entrenched with their forces, sixty thousand strong.
"Give me my own company at my back, my artillery well posted, my reserves in position, the enemy not too strongly entrenched, and our dear old Colonel's voice shouting
After the first surprise of the intelligence had a little abated, a rumor was spread through the entrenched camp, which stretched along the margin of the Hudson, forming a chain of outworks to the body of the fort itself, that a chosen detachment of fifteen hundred men was to depart, with the dawn, for William Henry, the post at the northern extremity of the portage.
The Happars, entrenched behind their mountains, and never even showing themselves on their summits, did not appear to me to furnish adequate cause for that excess of animosity evinced towards them by the heroic tenants of our vale, and I was inclined to believe that the deeds of blood attributed to them had been greatly exaggerated.
Bredin had entrenched himself behind the cash-desk, peering nervously at Paul through the cream, and Paul, pouring forth abuse in his native tongue, was brandishing a chocolate eclair.
His note-books impair his memory; his libraries overload his wit; the insurance-office increases the number of accidents; and it may be a question whether machinery does not encumber; whether we have not lost by refinement some energy, by a Christianity entrenched in establishments and forms some vigor of wild virtue.
'Take care, Sir,' said Dodson, who, though he was the biggest man of the party, had prudently entrenched himself behind Fogg, and was speaking over his head with a very pale face.
Whatever is the meaning of this odd little nook of grass and flowers, it is not an entrenched position.
Regretfully it seems unlikely that such entrenched views that presently exist will ever be put to one side even in the interest of the common good.