entwist

en·twist

 (ĕn-twĭst′)
tr.v. en·twist·ed, en·twist·ing, en·twists
To twist together; entwine.

entwist

(ɪnˈtwɪst)
vb (tr)
to twist together or around

en•twist

(ɛnˈtwɪst)

v.t.
to twist together or about.
[1580–90]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
So doth the woodbine the sweet honeysuckle / Gently entwist; the female ivy so / Enrings the barky fingers of the elm" (4.1.34-36, 37, 39-41).
Gardner criticizes science-challenged Shakespearean scholars for failing to understand the point of "So doth the woodbine and the sweet honeysuckle gently entwist" Honeysuckle always twines in a left-handed helix and woodbine in a right-handed one, so they cannot grow in intertwined helices and instead produce masses of unruly spirals.
First, the graft polymers can connect the two phases through the entwisted role, and the entwisted role can be enhanced by the increasing side chain content (23), (24).
When the compatibilizer gathered at the interface, D took part in the crosslink reaction because of its active vinyl group, whereas C only exhibited physical effects (the entwisted role).
Daily transitions are entwisted with the life-course frame and, together, the twisted time frames epitomize a wavering experience of time-space expansion and compression (Katz 2001).
The picture is suffused with correspondences between Humanity and Nature: curl of water and fluidity of blonde locks; strands of bright hair caught in leafy branches and entwisted in deep grass.
George Lang, in Entwisted Tongues: Comparative Creole Literatures, writes:
Entwisted Tongues turns around the quasi-teleological notion that high and public literacy is not only a positive and progressive goal, but crucial for collective well-being.
Lang, George, Entwisted Tongues: Comparative Creole Literatures (Amsterdam; Atlanta: Rodopi, 2000).