digestion

(redirected from enzymatic digestion)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia.

di·ges·tion

 (dī-jĕs′chən, dĭ-)
n.
1.
a. The process by which food is converted into substances that can be absorbed and assimilated by a living organism. In most animals it is accomplished in the digestive tract by the mechanical and enzymatic breakdown of foods into simpler chemical compounds.
b. The ability to digest food.
2. Biochemistry The process of decomposing complex organic substances into simpler substances, as by the action of enzymes or bacteria.
3. Chemistry The process of softening or disintegrating by means of chemical action, heat, or moisture.
4. Assimilation of ideas or information; understanding.

digestion

(dɪˈdʒɛstʃən; daɪ-)
n
1. (Physiology) the act or process in living organisms of breaking down ingested food material into easily absorbed and assimilated substances by the action of enzymes and other agents.
2. (Psychology) mental assimilation, esp of ideas
3. (Microbiology) bacteriol the decomposition of sewage by the action of bacteria
4. (Chemistry) chem the treatment of material with heat, solvents, chemicals, etc, to cause softening or decomposition
[C14: from Old French, from Latin digestiō a dissolving, digestion]
diˈgestional adj

di•ges•tion

(dɪˈdʒɛs tʃən, daɪ-)

n.
1. the process in the alimentary canal by which food is broken up physically, as by the action of the teeth, and chemically, as by the action of enzymes, and converted into a substance suitable for absorption and assimilation into the body.
2. the function or power of digesting food.
3. the act of digesting or the state of being digested.
[1350–1400; < Middle French < Latin]

di·ges·tion

(dī-jĕs′chən)
1. The process by which food is broken down into simple chemical compounds that can be absorbed and used as nutrients or eliminated by the body. In most animals, nutrients are obtained from food by the action of digestive enzymes. In humans and other higher vertebrates, digestion takes place mainly in the small intestine.
2. The decomposition of sewage by bacteria.

digestion

1. The breakdown of large food molecules into smaller ones prior to absorption.
2. The chemical and mechanical breakdown of foods into simple substances that can be absorbed by the body.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.digestion - the process of decomposing organic matter (as in sewage) by bacteria or by chemical action or heatdigestion - the process of decomposing organic matter (as in sewage) by bacteria or by chemical action or heat
chemical action, chemical change, chemical process - (chemistry) any process determined by the atomic and molecular composition and structure of the substances involved
2.digestion - the organic process by which food is converted into substances that can be absorbed into the body
gastric digestion - the process of breaking down proteins by the action of the gastric juice in the stomach
biological process, organic process - a process occurring in living organisms
3.digestion - learning and coming to understand ideas and information; "his appetite for facts was better than his digestion"
learning, acquisition - the cognitive process of acquiring skill or knowledge; "the child's acquisition of language"

digestion

noun ingestion, absorption, incorporation, assimilation Liquids served with meals interfere with digestion.
Related words
adjective peptic

digestion

noun
The process of absorbing and incorporating, especially mentally:
Translations
هَضْمقُدْرَه على الهَضْم
trávenízažívání
fordøjelse
ruoansulatus
probava
emésztésmegemésztés
meltingmeltingarstarfsemi
消化
소화
trávenie
prebava
matsmältning
การย่อย
sindirimsindirme
sự tiêu hóa

digestion

[dɪˈdʒestʃən] Ndigestión f

digestion

[daɪˈdʒɛstʃən dɪˈdʒɛstʃən daɪˈdʒɛstʃən] n
(= process) → digestion f
to aid digestion → aider la digestion
the digestion of sth → la digestion de qch
(= system) → digestion f

digestion

nVerdauung f

digestion

[dɪˈdʒɛstʃn] ndigestione f

digest

(daiˈdʒest) verb
1. to break up (food) in the stomach etc and turn it into a form which the body can use. The invalid had to have food that was easy to digest.
2. to take in and think over (information etc). It took me some minutes to digest what he had said.
noun
summary; brief account. a digest of the week's news.
diˈgestible adjective
able to be digested. This food is scarcely digestible.
diˈgestion (-tʃən) noun
1. the act of digesting food.
2. the ability of one's body to digest food. poor digestion.
diˈgestive (-tiv) adjective
of digestion. the human digestive system.

digestion

هَضْم trávení fordøjelse Verdauung χώνευση digestión ruoansulatus digestion probava digestione 消化 소화 spijsvertering fordøyelse trawienie digestão пищеварение matsmältning การย่อย sindirim sự tiêu hóa 消化

di·ges·tion

n. digestión, transformación de líquidos y sólidos en sustancias más simples para ser asimiladas por el organismo;
gastric ______ gástrica;
intestinal ______ intestinal, del intestino;
pancreatic ______ pancreática.

digestion

n digestión f
References in periodicals archive ?
Enzymatic digestion of CM peptide yielded a sample that was dilute and contained lysyl endopeptidase.
A possible explanation is that the efficiency of the enzymatic digestion is lowered by the conjugate or that the mass is altered in a nontrivial way.
The RFLP/ PCR approach used contains an internal control of enzymatic digestion to ensure its completion.
The detection of the two most prevalent mutations by PCR amplification of genomic DNA with or without mismatch primers and enzymatic digestion is an efficient method for the routine diagnosis of HFI because it identifies 85% of the alleles, is rapid and inexpensive, and may be used in all laboratories without specific qualification requirements.
The convergence of our hybrid front-end for FTMS, our proprietary magnets, and our new COMPASS software represents another enabling tool for rapid shot-gun proteomics and for the powerful top-down protein analysis approach that does not depend on enzymatic digestion as a precondition for protein sequence analysis.
A typical LC-MALDI protocol consists of sample purification, enzymatic digestion, separation of peptides by LC and identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprint.
The core element of the platform technology involves human proteins which - despite offering sufficient functionality - are subjected to enzymatic digestion in untreated cells due to genetic mutations in their structure.
After enzymatic digestion of the fragments, differences could be somewhat resolved.
Lawrence, Vice President of Marketing and Sales, said: "the Barozyme HT48 was specifically designed for rapid, high quality enzymatic digestion of proteins, a universally important procedure conducted in thousands of laboratories worldwide.
At present, two major approaches have been applied to isolate skeletal muscle satellite cells, the first approach is to break down the connective tissue network and myofibers to release the muscle satellite cells based on the mincing, enzymatic digestion and repetitive trituration of the muscle mass.
Other studies reported that, in addition to this contamination, there is the problem that osteoblasts isolated by enzymatic digestion fail to show any mineralization in vitro [29,30].