enzymology

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en·zy·mol·o·gy

 (ĕn′zə-mŏl′ə-jē)
n.
The branch of science that deals with the biochemical nature and activity of enzymes.

en′zy·mol′o·gist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

enzymology

(ˌɛnzaɪˈmɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Biochemistry) the branch of science concerned with the study of enzymes
enzymological adj
ˌenzyˈmologist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

en•zy•mol•o•gy

(ˌɛn zaɪˈmɒl ə dʒi, -zɪ-)

n.
the branch of biology that deals with the chemistry, biochemistry, and effects of enzymes.
[1895–1900]
en`zy•mol′o•gist, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

enzymology

the branch of biochemistry that studies enzym es. Also called zymology.enzymologist, n.
See also: Fermentation
the branch of biology that studies fermentation and enzymes. Also called zymology.enzymologist, n.enzymologie, enzymological, adj.
See also: Biology
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.enzymology - the branch of biochemistry dealing with the chemical nature and biological activity of enzymes
biochemistry - the organic chemistry of compounds and processes occurring in organisms; the effort to understand biology within the context of chemistry
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

en·zy·mol·o·gy

n. enzimología, estudio de las enzimas.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
Lead Finder satisfies the needs of computational chemists and medicinal chemists involved in the discovery process, pharmacologists and toxicologists involved in the modeling and evaluation of ADMET properties in silico, and biochemists and enzymologists working on enzyme specificity and rational enzyme design.
Enzymologists knew that catalysis must be accompanied by structural transitions of the catalyst.
The corollary of this, well known to practising enzymologists, is that a small [[epsiln].sub.K]/[K.sub.m] ratio is, generally, more desirable than a small [[epsilon].sub.V]/[V.sub.max] ratio (compare Figures 3A and 3B), as is clear from (7).