epanalepsis


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epanalepsis

(ɪˌpænəˈlɛpsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the repetition, after a more or less lengthy passage of subordinate or parenthetic text, of a word or clause that was used before
[C16: from Greek, from epi- + ana- + lēpis taking, from lambanein to take up]
ˌepanaˈleptic adj

epanalepsis

repetition of the same word or phrase after other words have intervened.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

epanalepsis

Repetition of a word or clause previously used after a long passage or digression.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epanalepsis - repetition after intervening words
repetition - the repeated use of the same word or word pattern as a rhetorical device
References in periodicals archive ?
See also Hugh Magennis, "Contrasting Narrative Emphases in the Old English Poem Judith and AElfric's Paraphrase of the Book of Judith," Neuphilologische Mitteilungen 96 (1995): 61-66; and Haruko Momma, "Epanalepsis: A Retelling of the Judith Story in the Anglo-Saxon Poetic Language," Studies in the Literary Imagination 36 (2003): 59-73.
conjunctions like "as much as" or "and" as well as parallelisms or epanalepsis), Whitman's "strict account of all" (68) literally becomes a balancing act, his calculations never stopping before an understanding of equal value is achieved.
symploce (initial and final repetition together) and epanalepsis (repetition at peripheries).
(53.) For these terms and epanalepsis, see Abraham Fraunce, The Arcadian Rhetorike (London, la88).
An ellipsis is prominently the premise of aphorisms, proverbs, axioms, slogans, whose persuasive power comes, among others, from limiting a statement to a minimum of signifiers necessary for its understanding: "Everyday vehicles that aren't" (Suzuki); reticence, the favorite method of slogans, consisting of interrupting the statement in order to let the audience complete it: "Fido, more good things and less fat" (food for dogs); repetition (or epanalepsis) strengthens the meaning.
The unusual word count of one-hundred seems okay, yet his first constraint rules out anadiplosis or epanalepsis: every anaphora is anathema.
Initial-final (epanalepsis (2)): "Choose, dearests, choose," she said, hoping that they would make haste.