epanorthosis


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epanorthosis

(ɪˌpænɔːˈθəʊsɪs)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric the almost immediate replacement of a preceding word or phrase by a more correct or more emphatic one, as for example in thousands, nay, millions
[C16: from Greek: correction, from epi- + ana- + orthos straight]
ˌepanorˈthotic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

epanorthosis

a rhetorical device in which something just said is repeated and stronger or more apt words are substituted.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

epanorthosis

The immediate replacement, in order to achieve an effect of stress, of one word or phrase by another that is considered more correct.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epanorthosis - immediate rephrasing for intensification or justification; "Seems, madam! Nay, it is"
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
<< Epanorthose >> vient du grec epanorthosis (<< redressement >>), de orthos (<< droit >>) : le texte tente de se redresser, alors que celui des plantes est impossible (la glycine s'enroule dans le sens des aiguilles d'une montre ou dans le sens inverse).
The latter three chapters identify rhetorical figures operating in select works: "epanorthosis" in Beckett's Molloy, Malone Dies, and The Unnamable; "hyperbole" in Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu; and "tautology" in Stein's The Making of Americans.
Wasser rejects allegorical interpretations of the works and presents epanorthosis, a figure associated with a going-back and undoing, in their stead.
are followed by remarkable uses of rhetorical epanorthosis or metanoia;
Here, however, through an epanorthosis, the narrative movement from es to puede ser signals two juxtaposed but linked concepts separated only by the temporal process of reading that moves from one to the other.