epeirogeny

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Related to epeirogenic: diastrophism

ep·ei·rog·e·ny

 (ĕp′ī-rŏj′ə-nē)
n. pl. ep·ei·rog·e·nies
Uplift or depression of the earth's crust, affecting large areas of land or ocean bottom.

[Greek ēpeiros, continent + -geny.]

e·pei′ro·gen′ic (ĭ-pī′rō-jĕn′ĭk) adj.
e·pei′ro·gen′i·cal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

epeirogeny

(ˌɛpaɪˈrɒdʒɪnɪ) or

epeirogenesis

n
(Geological Science) the formation and submergence of continents by broad relatively slow displacements of the earth's crust. Also called: epirogeny
[C19: from Greek ēpeiros continent + -geny]
epeirogenic, epeirogenetic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ep•ei•rog•e•ny

(ˌɛp aɪˈrɒdʒ ə ni)

n.
vertical or tilting movement of the earth's crust, generally affecting broad areas of a continent.
[1885–90; < Greek ḗpeiro(s) mainland, continent + -geny]
e•pei•ro•gen•ic (ɪˌpaɪ roʊˈdʒɛn ɪk) e•pei`ro•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

epeirogeny, epeirogenesis

the vertical movement or tilting of the earth’s crust, affecting broad expanses of continents. — epeirogenic, epeirogenetic, adj.
See also: Geology
the vertical movement or tilting of the earth’s crust, affecting broad expanses of continents. — epeirogenic, epeirogenetic, adj.
See also: Earth
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The regressive Early-Mid Cambrian 'Hawke Bay Event' in Baltoscandia: epeirogenic uplift in concert with eustasy.
Timing constraints indicate that uplif t of the Alvarado ridge followed a similar history throughout its geographic range [11,12], indicating it is a unitary tectonic (epeirogenic) landform--despite the overwhelming focus in the literature on the uplift of the Colorado Plateau and the resulting incision of the Grand Canyon.
Geomorphic and sedimentary response of rivers to tectonic deformation: a brief review and critique of a tool for recognizing subtle epeirogenic deformation in modern and ancient settings.