epexegesis

(redirected from epexegetic)

ep·ex·e·ge·sis

 (ĕp-ĕk′sə-jē′sĭs)
n.
Additional explanation or explanatory material.

[Greek epexēgēsis, from epexēgeisthai, to explain in detail : ep-, epi-, epi- + exēgeisthai, to explain; see exegesis.]

ep·ex′e·get′ic (-jĕt′ĭk), ep·ex′e·get′i·cal adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

epexegesis

(ɛˌpɛksɪˈdʒiːsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-ˌsiːz)
1. (Rhetoric) the addition of a phrase, clause, or sentence to a text to provide further explanation
2. (Rhetoric) the phrase, clause, or sentence added for this purpose
[C17: from Greek; see epi-, exegesis]
epexegetic, epˌexeˈgetical adj
epˌexeˈgetically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ep•ex•e•ge•sis

(ɛpˌɛk sɪˈdʒi sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-sēz).
1. the addition of a word or words to explain a preceding word or sentence.
2. the word or words so added.
[1615–25; < Greek epexḗgēsis explanation. See ep-, exegesis]
ep•ex`e•get′ic (-ˈdʒɛt ɪk) ep•ex`e•get′i•cal, adj.
ep•ex`e•get′i•cal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

epexegesis

an additional explanation; the use of more words to clarify further. — epexegetic, epexegetical, adj.
See also: Understanding
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Hence Kai is epexegetic: Proclus is saying that power comes from "'one,' that is, [phrase omitted]," and that power together with this one establishes being.
If we reexamine the apparitions language, we would realize that placing the idiom "to babble windy things" ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) in an epexegetic infinitive construction has made the phrase technically ambiguous.
This is based on an unlikely reading of the phrase "[TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]" ["to define and to speak"] such that the kai is epexegetic and the whole phrase means simply "to define".
He strives to exculpate the Moors from the accusation that they were incapable of precisely rendering the sacred texts in the idiomatic Romance vernaculars, and argues that both the liberal use of unassimilated borrowings (e.g., al-malakes 'angels') and the extended paraphrasing of epexegetic nature represent results of deliberate language manipulation on their part.
When he has a majority, he will take the Court as far as it is willing to go, restrained only by how much he worries about losing the majority if he gets too epexegetic.