ephemerid


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Related to ephemerid: dayfly

e·phem·er·id

 (ĭ-fĕm′ər-ĭd)
n.
A mayfly, especially one of the family Ephemeridae.

[From New Latin Ephēmeridae, former order name, from Greek ephēmeron, mayfly; see ephemeron.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

ephemerid

(ɪˈfɛmərɪd)
n
(Animals) any insect of the order Ephemeroptera (or Ephemerida), which comprises the mayflies. Also called: ephemeropteran
[C19: from New Latin Ephēmerida, from Greek ephēmeros short-lived + -id2]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

may•fly

(ˈmeɪˌflaɪ)

n., pl. -flies.
any of numerous insects of the family Ephemeridae, with large transparent forewings and threadlike tails, living for a relatively long period as an aquatic nymph and only for two days or less as an adult.
[1645–55]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ephemerid - short-lived insectephemerid - short-lived insect      
insect - small air-breathing arthropod
Plectophera - in some former classifications: name for the Ephemeroptera
dayfly, mayfly, shadfly - slender insect with delicate membranous wings having an aquatic larval stage and terrestrial adult stage usually lasting less than two days
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Both concerts will be conducted by the British principal conductor of the SF, James Judd.The piece about the life of a mayfly"Palingenia (a mayfly, or ephemerid) is the musical story of an unpretentious insect which lives for a mere 24 hours on the banks of the Danube river," an SF spokesperson describes.
If the question is viewed from all perspectives, then the answer would be: because there is something important or even something serious in them that exceeds the journalistic ephemerid, maintaining validity and significance in a horizon of time (and space).
This is an eleven-line gem, called "The Treasure." You'll see why I quote it: Mountains, a moment's earth-waves rising and hollowing; the earth too's an ephemerid; the stars-- Short-lived as grass the stars quicken in the nebula and dry in their summer, they spiral Blind up space, scattered black seeds of a future; nothing lives long, the whole sky's Recurrences tick the seconds of the hours of the ages of the gulf before birth, and the gulf After death is like dated: to labor eighty years in a notch of eternity is nothing too tiresome.