epibiosis

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epibiosis

(ˌɛpɪbaɪˈəʊsɪs)
n
(Biology) any relationship between two organisms in which one grows on the other but is not parasitic on it. See also epiphyte, epizoite
epibiotic adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Epibiotic diatoms are universally present on all sea turtle species.
Epibiotic Vibrio species have long been implicated in crustacean chitinolytic shell disease (Getchell 1989, Vogan et al.
The former invade the periplasmic space of its prey while the latter attaches to the external surface (epibiotic) to derive its nutrients [2, 3].
For comparison, we also include one balananoidean species from an entirely different habitat, namely, epibiotic in marine sponges, and a species from the Verrucomorpha, which is the sister group to the Balanomopha.
Orientation and position of substrata have large effects on epibiotic assemblages.
Unlike what occurs with symbiosis, species-specific, obligate epibionts are rare and the majority of epibiotic associations are therefore classified as facultative (Wahl & Mark, 1999).
Isolation of epibiotic bacteria was done by swabbing a small area of the coral surface with a sterile cotton swab.
Relationship between barnacle epibiotic load and hematologic parameters in loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), a comparison between migratory and residential animals in Pamlico Sound, North Carolina.
Mytilus byssus receives a 2- to 6.7-fold increase in stress induced by drag forces from epibiotic kelp [6].
For example, pond-reared adult Malaysian prawns (Macrobrachium rosenbergii) were noted to carry several epibiotic organisms: green algae Oedogonium crassiusculum and Cyanobacteria, where infested specimens composed 58% of the male population (Smith et al., 1979).
Jarms G and Tiemann H (1996) On a new hydropolyp without tentacles, Microhydrula limopsicola n.sp., epibiotic on bivalve shells from the Antarctic.