epic simile


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epic simile

n.
An extended simile elaborated in great detail. Also called Homeric simile.

epic simile

n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an extended simile, as used in the epic poetry of Homer and other writers

ep′ic sim′ile


n.
a simile developed over several lines of verse.
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Moreover, the quotations juxtaposed in this column have about them a visual or dramatic quality, as if Fuller reaches forward toward the inclusion of the photograph in newspaper reports or backward toward the narrative disruptions of the epic simile to make her point.
That "Milton was less innovative with the epic simile than critics from Whaler to Ricks have imagined" (388) seems a very reasonable claim, but the author risks appearing in the light of the ancient king in John Dryden's "Alexander's Feast," who has "Fought all his battles o'er again, / And thrice he routed all his foes, and thrice he slew the slain
In narrative poetry--Homer, say--the epic simile stops time, stops action, moves laterally (rather than "back" through time, or "ahead" in the story), so that we can see what other sort of thing, from another story, this thing in our story resembles.
16) But Milton's epic simile invokes a sovereign creature whose perfection and industry was exemplary and which admitted an astonishing range of metaphorical uses, from Catholic to Protestant and from Royalist to Republican.
Wickert realizes the muscularity and the fluidity of Tasso's heroic verse best when he relaxes slightly his efforts to match Tasso's syntax, as in his chilling rendering of the epic simile that describes Rinaldo breaking into the barricaded Temple of Solomon: "Even as a ravening wolf in darkening air / comes prowling round a sheepfold bolted fast, / his maw greedy and gaunt, his hunger and care / by inborn wrath and hate matched and surpassed.
Tucker reads the former as representing nation (and empire) building insofar as young men undergo tutelage culminating in marriage, a trope of newly made realms that can reconcile nature and passion, human feeling and body--rather as epic simile posits a joining but not identity of compatible elements.
The bold, epic simile of Death in his overcoat conjures a nineteenth-century figure suddenly transposed to a twenty-first-century present.
Thus poetic segmentation in each case interacts with narrative segmentation to produce a somewhat different focalization of this epic simile, in one case (Pope) relegating it unambiguously to the battlefield world, in other cases assimilating it weakly (Chapman) or strongly (Lattimore) to the god's-eye-view, in yet another (Logue) dissociating it from either of these diegetic planes and instead assigning it explicitly to the extra-diegetic plane of communication between narrator and narratee.
The figure appears again in the same register of meaning in Milton's antiprelatical tracts and in the epic simile comparing Satan to a "prowling wolf" (ecclesiastical corruption) in Paradise Lost (4.
So Apollonius's most Homeric similes draw the reader's attention to their Homeric qualities without necessarily deepening or enriching the narrative; and often his poetic strengths lie in decidedly un-Homeric directions, in, for example, the crafting of his famous simile of the aborigines in book 2--an epic simile likening dead aborigines to felled trees.
If she could not write a "legitimate" epic, it was possible to re-petition and re-cite the generic markers of the epic as a genre, the stylistic traits which indicate that the text "belongs" to the genre, such as the invocation of Calliope or the use of an epic simile or elevated style.