epical


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

epical

(ˈɛpɪkəl)
adj
(Poetry) characterized by an epic
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.epical - constituting or having to do with or suggestive of a literary epic; "epic tradition"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
"Myth and Epical Motifs in the Loki-Research." Temenos 3 (1968): 19-39.
He said that the day of liberation of Khorramshahr was recorded as 'the National Day of Resistance, Self-sacrifice and Victory' in the memory and history of Iran, which reminds of a great epical event that took place with the help of God and resistance against the enemy.
News Report It appears to be an epical mission--a fireman boarded people trapped in the burning Banani tower onto a crane and then tried to get down by a pipe only to meet his own end eventually.
The fresh epical meristem from eight varieties was used to conduct and extraction of DNA.
Nominated for the Nobel Prize, no less than Thomas Mann called The Salt of the Earth "mythical and epical."
Besides the collective, historical, and epical narrative of communist strength in safeguarding the country and smashing semi-colonialism and semi-feudalism in the seventeen-year literature, the second type of narrative focuses on the consolidation of ideology strength for the communist leadership.
While they transverse the length and breadth of Osun, making tall promises, bookmakers are of the view that the recurring Osun West agenda, high debt profile of the state, votes buying, workers' welfare and health service in the state may be on the front burner ahead of the epical battle.
And unlike any other child in any other part of the world, the author had been fortunate enough to enjoy a wide spectrum of such information in the forms of epical stories, anecdotes and mythology.
Coles, 'Democracy and the Radical Ordinary: Wolin and the Epical Emergency of Democratic Theory', in S.Hauerwas and R.
In Austen's world, that place is called a neighborhood; during World War I it is called a trench, but in both, a premium is placed on behaving well during "epical instants" of duress.
It consists of five associated anomalies: distal sternum defect, midline supraumbilical abdominal wall defect, ventral diaphragmatic hernia, defect in the epical pericardium and free communication into the peritoneal cavity, and congenital intracardiac defect [20].
In healthy tissues the expression of this mucin is restricted to the epical surface of the cells.