epicentre

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epicentre

(ˈɛpɪˌsɛntə) or

epicenter

n
1. (Geological Science) Also called: epicentrum the point on the earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake or underground nuclear explosion. Compare focus6
2. informal the absolute centre of something: the epicentre of world sprinting.
[C19: from New Latin epicentrum, from Greek epikentros over the centre, from epi- + kentron needle; see centre]
ˌepiˈcentral adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicentre - the point on the Earth's surface directly above the focus of an earthquake
geographic point, geographical point - a point on the surface of the Earth
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
epicentrum
epicenter
episentriepisentrumi
epicentrum
episenter
震央震源地
epicentras
epicentrs
epicentrum
epicentrum
epicenter
epicentrum
епіцентр
chấn tâm

epicentre

epicenter (US) [ˈepɪsentəʳ] Nepicentro m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

epicentre

[ˈɛpɪsɛntər] epicenter (US) népicentre m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

epicentre

, (US) epicenter
nEpizentrum nt
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

epicentre

epicenter (Am) [ˈɛpɪˌsɛntəʳ] nepicentro
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
may be felt at great distance from their epicenters," it later added.
In addition, dark solid borders are used to mark epicenters at a depth of 70 to 300 kilometers, while dark solid borders with slants refer to epicenters at a depth of more than 300 kilometers.
Seismologists say two earthquakes have struck southwestern Greece, both with preliminary magnitudes 5 but with different epicenters. No injuries or damage were immediately reported.
The CDC names new Prevention Epicenters every 5 years based on peer-reviewed grant applications.
No Epicenters are up and operating, but Gordon has been negotiating for locations.
The tests, which could begin early next year, would target seizure epicenters "right before we cut them out in the operating room," he observes.
The current trend in systematizing thin-film deposition processes likely will see more Epicenters in the future.
MAP BELOW: This map of Turkey shows the epicenter of last August's devastating quake.