epicondyle


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Related to epicondyle: lateral epicondyle, Medial epicondyle

ep·i·con·dyle

 (ĕp′ĭ-kŏn′dĭl, -dl)
n.
A rounded projection at the end of a bone, located on or above a condyle and usually serving as a place of attachment for ligaments and tendons.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

epicondyle

(ˌɛpɪˈkɒndɪl)
n
(Anatomy) a bone projection above a condyle
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicondyle - a projection on a bone above a condyle serving for the attachment of muscles and ligaments
appendage, outgrowth, process - a natural prolongation or projection from a part of an organism either animal or plant; "a bony process"
lateral epicondyle - epicondyle near the lateral condyle of the femur
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

ep·i·con·dyle

n. epicóndilo, eminencia sobre el cóndilo de un hueso.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

epicondyle

n (of elbow) (lateral) epicóndilo (lateral); (medial) epitróclea, epi-cóndilo medial (esp. Amer)
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
When the extensor carpi radialis brevis (ECRB) muscle, which helps stabilize the wrist when the elbow is straight, is overused, the tendon can develop microscopic tears where it attaches to the lateral epicondyle, a bump on the end of the upper arm bone, the humerus.
His left arm was stuck in flexion, with an inability to fully extend it; his left lateral epicondyle was enlarged and inflamed around the joint; his PIPS/DIPS were inflamed bilaterally.
In addition, del Sol & Vieira (1989) described the chondroepicondilar muscle, supernumerary fascicle of the pectoralis major muscle, that extends from the six and seventh costal cartilages and ascend with the muscle fibers and generates a long and thin tendon that extends from the anterior lip of the intertubercular groove to the medial epicondyle of the humerus.
In a study on iliotibial tract, the tract was attached to the femur along the linea aspera from the greater tronchanter to, and including, the lateral epicondyle of the femur by coarse fibrous bands.7 Linea aspera has important prominence which protects the femur against bending when bearing the stresses and loads.
The mnemonic "CRITOE" (Capitellum, Radial head, Internal (medial) epicondyle, Trochlea, Olecranon and External (lateral) epicondyle) can help diagnose certain fractures, particularly those where an ossification center 'appears' out of the expected order.
A number of uncertainties surround the evaluation and treatment of medial epicondyle fractures of the humerus in children.
Palmaris longus (PL) is a thin muscle which originates from the medial epicondyle by a short belly, located superficially in the middle of the anterior aspect of the forearm.
Use of the epicondylar axis was logical because it essentially paralleled the center of knee rotation and was applied to the femoral rotational alignment during TKA.[14],[15] The surgical epicondylar axis was identified by two points, one on the medial epicondyle (sulcus) and one on the lateral epicondyle (prominence).[16] The AIN was used as a bony anatomical landmark to identify the proper entry point [Figure 2]b.
Also known as tennis/golfer's elbow, lateral/ medial epicondyle pain is thought to result from overuse of the common wrist extensor/ flexor muscle origins at the site of the myotendinous junctions.
Two small incisions were made, one just beneath and off the superior pole of patella and another starting at the adductor tubercle and ending just distal to the medial epicondyle of the femur.
The chronological order of appearance of the elbow ossification centers follows this rule: capitellum, radial head, medial epicondyle, trochlea, olecranon, and lateral epicondyle.
The concentric and eccentric phases of shoulder abduction were identified by calculating the midpoint from the medial and lateral epicondyle reflective markers.