epicurean


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Related to epicurean: Epicurean philosophy

ep·i·cu·re·an

 (ĕp′ĭ-kyo͝o-rē′ən, -kyo͝or′ē-)
adj.
1. Devoted to the pursuit of sensual pleasure, especially to the enjoyment of good food and comfort.
2. Suited to the tastes of an epicure: an epicurean feast.
3. Epicurean Of or relating to Epicurus or Epicureanism.
n.
1. A devotee to sensuous and luxurious living; an epicure.
2. Epicurean A follower of Epicurus.

[Middle English Epicurien, from Epicure; see epicure.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

epicurean

(ˌɛpɪkjʊˈriːən)
adj
1. devoted to sensual pleasures, esp food and drink; hedonistic
2. suitable for an epicure: an epicurean feast.
n
an epicure; gourmet
ˌepicuˈreanˌism n

Epicurean

(ˌɛpɪkjʊˈriːən)
adj
(Philosophy) of or relating to the philosophy of Epicurus
n
(Philosophy) a follower of the philosophy of Epicurus
ˌEpicuˈreanˌism n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

ep•i•cu•re•an

(ˌɛp ɪ kyʊˈri ən, -ˈkyʊər i-)

adj.
1. having luxurious tastes or habits, esp. in eating and drinking.
2. fit for an epicure.
3. (cap.) of, pertaining to, or characteristic of Epicurus or Epicureanism.
n.
4. an epicure.
5. (cap.) a disciple of Epicurus.
[1350–1400; Middle English Epicurien < Latin Epicūrē(us) of Epicurus (< Greek Epikoúreios) + -an1]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epicurean - a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)epicurean - a person devoted to refined sensuous enjoyment (especially good food and drink)
sensualist - a person who enjoys sensuality
Adj.1.Epicurean - of Epicurus or epicureanism; "Epicurean philosophy"
2.epicurean - devoted to pleasure; "a hedonic thrill"; "lives of unending hedonistic delight"; "epicurean pleasures"
indulgent - characterized by or given to yielding to the wishes of someone ; "indulgent grandparents"
3.epicurean - displaying luxury and furnishing gratification to the senses; "an epicurean banquet"; "enjoyed a luxurious suite with a crystal chandelier and thick oriental rugs"; "Lucullus spent the remainder of his days in voluptuous magnificence"; "a chinchilla robe of sybaritic lavishness"
indulgent - characterized by or given to yielding to the wishes of someone ; "indulgent grandparents"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

epicurean

adjective
1. hedonistic, self-indulgent, luxurious, sensual, lush, luscious, voluptuous, libertine, sybaritic, pleasure-seeking, bacchanalian, gluttonous, gourmandizing dishes which will send you into transports of epicurean delight
noun
1. gourmet, foodie, bon vivant (French), epicure, gastronome I am no great epicurean - give me simple food every time.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

epicurean

adjective
1. Characterized by or devoted to pleasure and luxury as a lifestyle:
2. Relating to, suggestive of, or appealing to sense gratification:
noun
A person devoted to pleasure and luxury:
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations

epicurean

[ˌepɪkjʊˈriːən]
A. ADJepicúreo
B. Nepicúreo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

epicurean

[ˌɛpɪkjʊəˈriːən] adj [dish, food] → épicurien(ne)
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

epicurean

adjepikureisch (geh)
nEpikureer m (geh), → Genussmensch m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

epicurean

[ˌɛpɪkjʊˈriːən] adj & nepicureo/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"Monsieur," said Conrart, "you yourself are in the wrong persisting in decorating yourself with the name of an Epicurean; indeed, nothing here reminds me of the doctrine of the philosopher of Gargetta."
"An Epicurean's dress?" asked D'Artagnan, in a tone of inquiry.
The first time he submitted one of these saline salads to my critical attention I naturally thought that anything collected at such pains must possess peculiar merits; but one mouthful was a complete dose; and great was the consternation of the old warrior at the rapidity with which I ejected his Epicurean treat.
He had read somewhere that every man was born a Platonist, an Aristotelian, a Stoic, or an Epicurean; and the history of George Henry Lewes (besides telling you that philosophy was all moonshine) was there to show that the thought of each philospher was inseparably connected with the man he was.
Convinced, eloquent,--again and again the notes of Epicurean philosophy fall almost unconsciously from his lips.
It seemed that his route to the coveted island was not to be an epicurean one.
But, as yet, Stubb heeded not the mumblings of the banquet that was going on so nigh him, no more than the sharks heeded the smacking of his own epicurean lips.
His features might have been called good, had there not lurked under the pent-house of his eye, that sly epicurean twinkle which indicates the cautious voluptuary.
The other had a face that was brilliant with health, and jovially worth of an epicurean. Both were deeply sun-burned, and their high gaiters of tanned leather showed signs of the bogs and the thickets they had just come through.
To sage Philosophy next lend thine ear, From heaven descended to the low-roofed house Of Socrates--see there his tenement-- Whom, well inspired, the Oracle pronounced Wisest of men; from whose mouth issued forth Mellifluous streams, that watered all the schools Of Academics old and new, with those Surnamed Peripatetics, and the sect Epicurean, and the Stoic severe.
He himself and his philosophy of life were purely Epicurean, Hedonistic, or pagan, in the sense in which we use those terms to-day.
She followed the traditions of the epicurean churchman to whom this valuable garden owed its origin; but Benassis himself regarded it with sufficient indifference.