epideictic


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Related to epideictic: epideictic display

epideictic

(ˌɛpɪˈdaɪktɪk) or

epideictical

adj
(Rhetoric) designed to display something, esp the skill of the speaker in rhetoric. Also: epidictic
[C18: from Greek epideiktikos, from epideiknunai to display, show off, from deiknunai to show]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.epideictic - designed primarily for rhetorical display; "epideictic orations"
demonstrative - given to or marked by the open expression of emotion; "an affectionate and demonstrative family"
References in periodicals archive ?
You (2006) notes that the practice of ritualization in Chinese rhetorical tradition is akin to Aristotle's epideictic rhetoric, a genre of speech in which rhetors cultivate communal and civic virtues through speech.
was you until your head turned and are you in breathless air The unsatisfactory, halting music of the original is rendered into an epideictic hypallage; a poor cadence is remade into a vibrant sonic image of the thing being described--a mode of the beautiful itself, whose precious rarity in this long satanic ode requires careful cultivation.
Elsewhere, I have followed a similar methodology to trace Juana Ines's subjectivity in her portraiture poems, arguing that her gestures toward the epideictic in these lyric poems opens a space for the neuter, or ternary logic, in a genre dominated by male subjectivity.
Given the wide scope of this discussion, I propose to focus, in this paper, on the glosses given to Chapman's elegy The Shadow of Night (Figure 1) --presumably written by the author himself (Snare, 1989)--and examine the different prescriptive and epideictic functions they assume within the poetic work as a whole.
We argue Skylar's Law follows a trend typical of memorial crime legislation (Surette 2007), where crime policy is a new form of epideictic speech.
(2) The necessary intellectual and historical resources for an epideictic poetry of place were available for writers to draw on in the years before and after the early seventeenth century (Penshurst Place, as Heather Dubrow reminds us, had existed in some form since "around 1350"); but in the Jacobean and early Caroline period a need arose for a specific kind of legitimizing poetic tribute centered on individual houses and their lands.
Aristotle acknowledged this challenge when he pointed to the difficult but necessary task of epideictic orators: on the one hand, to praise those who had achieved something (egkomiazomen praxantes) and, on the other, to give the impression of a virtuous character by making actions appear so (praxeis epideiknysai) (15).
While Paul presented his epilogue in Galatians 6: 11-18 in forensic terms, in front of the lawyer (Betz 1979: 313), the same epilogue gives him the opportunity to present a summary of the message of the Letter to Galatians, in epideictic terms.
It is relevant to my central questions about literature scholarship--its status as research or display--to note that rhetorical theory would classify both the early evaluative criticism and the recent creative-critical work as epideictic rhetoric.
Thus, I argue that Whitman's apostrophic invocations--particularly exhortations preceded by and through the declamatory O --endorse urgent epideictic messages in the years immediately preceding the Civil War while also carrying with them the hallmarks of lyrical address.
EPIDEICTIC A Done for show or display B Affecting a community C Nail-skin or cuticle who am I?