histogram

(redirected from epidemiological distribution)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

his·to·gram

 (hĭs′tə-grăm′)
n.
A bar graph of a frequency distribution in which one axis lists each unique value (or range of continuous values) in a set of data, and the area of each bar represents the frequency (or relative frequency) of that value (or range of continuous values).

[Greek histos, mast, web; see stā- in Indo-European roots + -gram.]

histogram

(ˈhɪstəˌɡræm)
n
(Statistics) a statistical graph that represents the frequency of values of a quantity by vertical rectangles of varying heights and widths. The width of the rectangles is in proportion to the class interval under consideration, and their areas represent the relative frequency of the phenomenon in question. See also stem-and-leaf diagram
[C20: perhaps from histo(ry) + -gram]

his•to•gram

(ˈhɪs təˌgræm)

n.
a bar graph of a frequency distribution in which the bars are displayed proportionate to the corresponding frequencies.
[1890–95; < Greek histó(s) mast, beam, web + -gram1]

histogram

Statistics. a graph showing frequency distribution in which rectangles based on the horizontal axis are assigned widths that correspond to class intervals and heights that correspond to frequency.
See also: Representation
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.histogram - a bar chart representing a frequency distribution; heights of the bars represent observed frequencies
bar chart, bar graph - a chart with bars whose lengths are proportional to quantities
Translations

histogram

[ˈhɪstəgræm] Nhistograma m

histogram

[ˈhɪstəgræm] nhistogramme m

histogram

[ˈhɪstəˌgræm] nistogramma m
References in periodicals archive ?
1 The epidemiological distribution of HCC varies across the globe being the highest in south East Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.
Hence, the biological and geo-climatic conditions provide favourable condition required for the epidemiological distribution of fasciolosis.
Although the book discusses many aspects of the current situation, such as epidemiological distribution, progress in vaccine development, and advances in the diagnosis of PPR diagnostic procedures, information regarding the most recent developments is lacking; a few chapters were written in [approximately equal to] 2000 before the increase in PPR research.

Full browser ?