epidemiology


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ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

 (ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē, -dĕm′ē-)
n.
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

[Medieval Latin epidēmia, an epidemic; see epidemic + -logy.]

ep′i·de′mi·o·log′ic (-ə-lŏj′ĭk), ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal (-ĭ-kəl) adj.
ep′i·de′mi·o·log′i·cal·ly adv.
ep′i·de′mi·ol′o·gist n.

epidemiology

(ˌɛpɪˌdiːmɪˈɒlədʒɪ)
n
(Medicine) the branch of medical science concerned with the occurrence, transmission, and control of epidemic diseases
epidemiological, ˌepiˌdemioˈlogic adj
ˌepiˌdemioˈlogically adv
ˌepiˌdemiˈologist n

ep•i•de•mi•ol•o•gy

(ˌɛp ɪˌdi miˈɒl ə dʒi, -ˌdɛm i-)

n.
1. the branch of medicine dealing with the incidence and prevalence of disease in large populations and with detection of the source and cause of epidemics.
2. the factors contributing to the presence or absence of a disease.
[1870–75]
ep`i•de`mi•o•log′i•cal (-əˈlɒdʒ ɪ kəl) adj.
ep`i•de`mi•o•log′i•cal•ly, adv.
ep`i•de`mi•ol′o•gist, n.

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

(ĕp′ĭ-dē′mē-ŏl′ə-jē)
The branch of medicine that deals with the study of the causes, distribution, and control of disease in populations.

epidemiology

1. the study of the relationships of the various factors determining the frequency and distribution of diseases in a human community.
2. the field of medicine that attempts to determine the exact causes of localized outbreaks of disease. — epidemiologist, n. — epidemiologie, epidemiological, adj.
See also: Medical Specialties

epidemiology

The branch of medicine that deals with epidemics, including their transmission and control.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epidemiology - the branch of medical science dealing with the transmission and control of disease
medical specialty, medicine - the branches of medical science that deal with nonsurgical techniques
index case - the earliest documented case of a disease that is included in an epidemiological study
prevalence - (epidemiology) the ratio (for a given time period) of the number of occurrences of a disease or event to the number of units at risk in the population
Translations
epidemiologie
epidemiologia
faraldsfræði

epidemiology

ep·i·de·mi·ol·o·gy

n. epidemiología, estudio de las causas de las enfermedades epidémicas y la distribución en poblaciones.

epidemiology

n epidemiología, estudio de la propagación de enfermedades en poblaciones
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This year the topics are mobility and epidemiology.

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