epigeous


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ep·i·ge·ous

 (ĕp′ə-jē′əs)
adj.
Variant of epigeal.

epigeous

(ˌɛpɪˈdʒiːəs)
adj
(Botany) a variant of epigeal
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References in periodicals archive ?
Differences in alpha and beta diversities of epigeous arthropod assemblages in two ecoregions of northwestern Argentina.
Thus, there should be tangible long-term consequences due to volcanic ash on the surviving biota after ash fall out, especially in cases where adults of a species are epigeous and larvae hypogeous, showing vulnerability to ash during both phases of the insect life cycle.
Still, despite of their subterranean habits, they do depend on epigeous environment, a fact that should partially explain retention of performance traits shared by surface-dwelling small mammals.
Fungi or also known as "mushroom" is defined as "macrofungus" with a distinctive fruiting body, it can be hypogeous or epigeous, large enough to be seen by the naked eye and usually pick up by hands.
Other authors had already noted the association of time with colonization patterns of epigeous fauna.
Epigeous and hypogeous fungi are also important foods for Red Squirrels in some areas, particularly during autumn and winter (CC Smith 1968; Ferron and others 1986; Currah and others 2000).
In spite of the low reproducibility and the difficulty in finding patterns, the monolith is one of the most frequently used methods to study soil fauna, because it looks at all kinds, not only the more mobile epigeous fauna (Baretta et al., 2007a, b; Barros et al., 2002; Bignell, 2009; Velasquez et al., 2007).
Cross (1969) showed the importance of fungi in their diet, with specialty in subterranean fungi but also epigeous fungi and gill mushrooms (Steinecker 1977; Byrne 1979).
It was calculated as the ratio between total epigeous dry matter at harvest and total water used calculated by balance.
The fungal spores for these two groups are located in a special structure called the basidium (for Basidiomycetes) or the ascus (for Ascomycetes), and such mushrooms can grow either above the earth (epigeous macrofungi), giving mainly umbrella like structures which include basidiospores, or at depths of 10-20 cm below the soil surface (hypogeous macrofungi or truffles).
aspersus) with only small and few or variable number of entrances/exits or additionally have an epigeous mound (of variable height) such as in the case of A.