epigonic


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ep·i·gone

 (ĕp′ĭ-gōn′)
n.
A second-rate imitator or follower, especially of an artist or a philosopher.

[French épigone, sing. of épigones, from Greek Epigonoi, sons of the seven heroes against Thebes, from pl. of epigonos, born after : epi-, epi- + gonos, child, seed; see genə- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·gon′ic (-gŏn′ĭk) adj.
e·pig′on·ism (ĭ-pĭg′ə-nĭz′əm) n.

epigonic

(ˌɛpɪˈɡɒnɪk) or

epigonous

adj
of an epigone
References in periodicals archive ?
But this isn't an epigonic "Price Point AR," and even though its MSRP is a very reasonable $759.99, the RRAGE can hold its own with competing rifles.
The present piece is not meant to be epigonic, but as making a contribution to the African renaissance by providing a base for Africana social theory development.
have received fervid impulses [notice his word "impulsos"] from the son of Long Island." (27) In 1920, an article in Cervantes about Guillermo de Torre--a major player in Ultraismo and a promoter of the Hispanophone avant-gardes--describes de Torre's "epigonic admiration for Whitman, Verhaeren, Marinetti," (28) among others, and argues that Whitman was one of de Torre's aesthetic "evolutionary ancestors"; (29) and de Torre himself refers to Whitman in his article on the aesthetics of Ultraismo in the same year.
He never differentiated between the epigonic faith and the reason-based faith.
The main reason was the fact that Italian petrarchism itself has never been the subject of scientific research in Russia until recently and as an epigonic phenomenon was never considered worthy of serious consideration in this country (Yakushkina, 2009).