epigram


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ep·i·gram

 (ĕp′ĭ-grăm′)
n.
1. A short, witty poem expressing a single thought or observation.
2. A concise, clever, often paradoxical statement.
3. Epigrammatic discourse or expression.

[Middle English, from Old French epigramme, from Latin epigramma, from Greek, from epigraphein, to mark the surface, inscribe : epi-, epi- + graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots.]

epigram

(ˈɛpɪˌɡræm)
n
1. a witty, often paradoxical remark, concisely expressed
2. (Poetry) a short, pungent, and often satirical poem, esp one having a witty and ingenious ending
[C15: from Latin epigramma, from Greek: inscription, from epigraphein to write upon, from graphein to write]
ˌepigramˈmatic, ˌepigramˈmatical adj
ˌepigramˈmatically adv

ep•i•gram

(ˈɛp ɪˌgræm)

n.
1. a witty, ingenious, or pointed saying tersely expressed.
2. epigrammatic expression: a genius for epigram.
3. a short, concise poem, often satirical, displaying a witty or ingenious turn of thought.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin epigramma < Greek epígramma inscription, epigram. See epi-, -gram1]

epigram

a pithy statement, often containing a paradox. — epigrammatist, n.
See also: Proverbs
a pithy statement, often containing a paradox.
See also: Language

epigram

A brief but memorable statement making a pithy observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epigram - a witty saying
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

epigram

noun witticism, quip, aphorism, bon mot, witty saying, witty poem Oscar Wilde was famous for his epigrams.
Quotations
"A thing well said will be wit in all languages" [John Dryden Essay of Dramatic Poesy]
Translations
epigram
epigramma
epigramma

epigram

[ˈepɪgræm] Nepigrama m

epigram

[ˈɛpɪgræm] népigramme m

epigram

n (= saying)Epigramm nt, → Sinngedicht nt

epigram

[ˈɛpɪˌgræm] nepigramma m
References in classic literature ?
You would sacrifice anybody, Harry, for the sake of an epigram.
He spends the whole day in settling whether Homer expressed himself correctly or not in such and such a line of the Iliad, whether Martial was indecent or not in such and such an epigram, whether such and such lines of Virgil are to be understood in this way or in that; in short, all his talk is of the works of these poets, and those of Horace, Perseus, Juvenal, and Tibullus; for of the moderns in our own language he makes no great account; but with all his seeming indifference to Spanish poetry, just now his thoughts are absorbed in making a gloss on four lines that have been sent him from Salamanca, which I suspect are for some poetical tournament.
Though he guessed much from observations of this kind, the chevalier was discretion itself; he was never betrayed into an epigram (he had plenty of wit) which might have closed to him an agreeable salon.
I am afraid I have often smiled with hypocritical assent, and gratified them with an epigram on the fleeting nature of our illusions, which any one moderately acquainted with French literature can command at a moment's notice.
She was testing the validity of her epigram in a daring way, and for a moment the shadow of my vision--the Bertha whose soul was no secret to me--passed between me and the radiant girl, the playful sylph whose feelings were a fascinating mystery.
The epigram cannot be gainsayed; but the necessity is a thing that does not exist.
I have always been with you," Miss Tita rejoined very mildly, and evidently with no intention of making an epigram.
She missed Cecil's epigram, but grasped the feeling that prompted it.
There was a line coming at the bottom of the page which he was then reading which ought to hit him, an epigram on golf, a whimsical thought put almost exactly as he had put it himself five minutes back when telling his golf story.
Sillerton Jackson, with the air of producing an epigram.
In those days conversation was still cultivated as an art; a neat repartee was more highly valued than the crackling of thorns under a pot; and the epigram, not yet a mechanical appliance by which the dull may achieve a semblance of wit, gave sprightliness to the small talk of the urbane.
Before Anna Pavlovna and the others had time to smile their appreciation of the vicomte's epigram, Pierre again broke into the conversation, and though Anna Pavlovna felt sure he would say something inappropriate, she was unable to stop him.