epigram


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ep·i·gram

 (ĕp′ĭ-grăm′)
n.
1. A short, witty poem expressing a single thought or observation.
2. A concise, clever, often paradoxical statement.
3. Epigrammatic discourse or expression.

[Middle English, from Old French epigramme, from Latin epigramma, from Greek, from epigraphein, to mark the surface, inscribe : epi-, epi- + graphein, to write; see gerbh- in Indo-European roots.]

epigram

(ˈɛpɪˌɡræm)
n
1. a witty, often paradoxical remark, concisely expressed
2. (Poetry) a short, pungent, and often satirical poem, esp one having a witty and ingenious ending
[C15: from Latin epigramma, from Greek: inscription, from epigraphein to write upon, from graphein to write]
ˌepigramˈmatic, ˌepigramˈmatical adj
ˌepigramˈmatically adv

ep•i•gram

(ˈɛp ɪˌgræm)

n.
1. a witty, ingenious, or pointed saying tersely expressed.
2. epigrammatic expression: a genius for epigram.
3. a short, concise poem, often satirical, displaying a witty or ingenious turn of thought.
[1400–50; late Middle English < Latin epigramma < Greek epígramma inscription, epigram. See epi-, -gram1]

epigram

a pithy statement, often containing a paradox. — epigrammatist, n.
See also: Proverbs
a pithy statement, often containing a paradox.
See also: Language

epigram

A brief but memorable statement making a pithy observation.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epigram - a witty saying
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"

epigram

noun witticism, quip, aphorism, bon mot, witty saying, witty poem Oscar Wilde was famous for his epigrams.
Quotations
"A thing well said will be wit in all languages" [John Dryden Essay of Dramatic Poesy]
Translations
epigram
epigramma
epigramma

epigram

[ˈepɪgræm] Nepigrama m

epigram

[ˈɛpɪgræm] népigramme m

epigram

n (= saying)Epigramm nt, → Sinngedicht nt

epigram

[ˈɛpɪˌgræm] nepigramma m
References in classic literature ?
Epigram iii on Midas of Larissa was otherwise attributed to Cleobulus of Lindus, one of the Seven Sages; the address to Glaucus (xi) is purely Hesiodic; xiii, according to MM.
He tried to make epigrams all the time, and I got so nervous, expecting them, you know, that I spilt the tea--and he made an epigram about that
In those days conversation was still cultivated as an art; a neat repartee was more highly valued than the crackling of thorns under a pot; and the epigram, not yet a mechanical appliance by which the dull may achieve a semblance of wit, gave sprightliness to the small talk of the urbane.
The epigram cannot be gainsayed; but the necessity is a thing that does not exist.
And, when the whim changes, it is most easy and delightfully disconcerting to play with the respectable and cowardly bourgeois fetishes and to laugh and epigram at the flitting god-ghosts and the debaucheries and follies of wisdom.
In the society in which she lived such plain statements produced the effect of the wittiest epigram.
Dryden's general quality and a large part of his achievement are happily summarized in Lowell's epigram that he 'was the greatest poet who ever was or ever could be made wholly out of prose.
Before Anna Pavlovna and the others had time to smile their appreciation of the vicomte's epigram, Pierre again broke into the conversation, and though Anna Pavlovna felt sure he would say something inappropriate, she was unable to stop him.
The epigram, with its faint whiff of the eighties, meant nothing.
The machinery it has set up for the detection of crime is miserably ineffective--and yet only invent a moral epigram, saying that it works well, and you blind everybody to its blunders from that moment.
He spends the whole day in settling whether Homer expressed himself correctly or not in such and such a line of the Iliad, whether Martial was indecent or not in such and such an epigram, whether such and such lines of Virgil are to be understood in this way or in that; in short, all his talk is of the works of these poets, and those of Horace, Perseus, Juvenal, and Tibullus; for of the moderns in our own language he makes no great account; but with all his seeming indifference to Spanish poetry, just now his thoughts are absorbed in making a gloss on four lines that have been sent him from Salamanca, which I suspect are for some poetical tournament.
She had never heard of Tallyrand and did not understand epigrams.