epigrammatist


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ep·i·gram·ma·tism

 (ĕp′ĭ-grăm′ə-tĭz′əm)
n.
Literary style marked by the use of epigrams.

ep′i·gram′ma·tist n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert Hayman the epigrammatist wrote verses to both John and Anne.
This is reflected in the index, in which neither George Herbert nor Andrew Marvell appears (though Marvell is in fact mentioned briefly on 869), and John Owen--an epigrammatist read enthusiastically across Europe--receives only two passing mentions.
However, some (for example, a contemporary of the Roman emperor Nero epigrammatist Lukillios) argued that once in a series of victories Milon did touch the sand arena with his knee.
53-4), and the epigrammatist forges a link between the man mythically privileged to view the goddess nude, the artist, and now all of Cnidus.
He was an epigrammatist, a sharp observer of human behaviour and a lover of puns.
A shower of wit puts the art of the epigrammatist on
For example, in her famous correspondence with Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Dickinson shuttles from flirt to adoring "scholar," condescending epigrammatist to eyelash-batting naif.
This would enrich the poem's discourse on ekphrasis by a recourse to the prototypical encounter of visual and literary art, (16) the epigrammatic fiction of a speaking stone set in relief by the silent stone on which the epigram is inscribed, an encounter devised by the antagonistic collusion of the stonemason and the epigrammatist versed in the rhetoric of prosopopoeia.
This was the approach of the influential German epigrammatist Andreas Gryphius: Book 1 of his Oden und Epigramme (1663) consists of 100 religious poems, while Books 2 and 3 are secular and satirical (Angress 108).
Early on, the "spectre of the sluggish matron" becomes in Marie the "radiance of the mettlesome maid"; Helen has, pointedly, kept her maiden name; ever the epigrammatist, Foley tells us that "Ignominy is the most faithful handmaiden of Eros.
Professional epigrammatist Ashleigh Brilliant routinely threatens legal action when his coffee mug and refrigerator magnet quips are appropriated without consent, credit or compensation.
The desired effect of deceit, or ambiguity on behalf of the epigrammatist, is also typical of the dandy, only he does not grant his reader or spectator any final satisfaction.