epigraph

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epigraph

an inscription on a building or statue; quotation at the beginning of a book or chapter
Not to be confused with:
epigram – witticism, quip; ingenious saying tersely expressed

ep·i·graph

 (ĕp′ĭ-grăf′)
n.
1. An inscription, as on a statue or building.
2. A motto or quotation, as at the beginning of a literary composition, setting forth a theme.

[Greek epigraphē, from epigraphein, to write on; see epigram.]

ep′i·graph′ic, ep′i·graph′i·cal adj.
ep′i·graph′i·cal·ly adv.

epigraph

(ˈɛpɪˌɡrɑːf; -ˌɡræf)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a quotation at the beginning of a book, chapter, etc, suggesting its theme
2. an inscription on a monument or building
[C17: from Greek epigraphē; see epigram]
epigraphic, ˌepiˈgraphical adj
ˌepiˈgraphically adv

ep•i•graph

(ˈɛp ɪˌgræf)

n.
1. an inscription, esp. on a building, statue, etc.
2. an apposite quotation at the beginning of a book, chapter, etc.
[1615–25; < Greek epigraphḗ inscription. See epi-, -graph]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epigraph - a quotation at the beginning of some piece of writing
quotation, quote, citation - a passage or expression that is quoted or cited
2.epigraph - an engraved inscription
inscription, lettering - letters inscribed (especially words engraved or carved) on something
Translations

epigraph

[ˈepɪgrɑːf] Nepígrafe m

epigraph

nEpigraf nt, → Inschrift f; (at beginning of book, chapter) → Motto nt, → Sinnspruch m

epigraph

[ˈɛpɪˌgrɑːf] nepigrafe f
References in classic literature ?
The count seized it hastily, his eyes immediately fell upon the epigraph, and he read, "`Thou shalt tear out the dragons' teeth, and shall trample the lions under foot, saith the Lord.'"
Though Gonzalez is mainly interested in the literary aspects of epitaphs on Greek memorials of the Archaic and Classical periods, her selection from the extensive corpus of epigraphs gives priority to the few for which the corresponding images, statues, or steles are still standing, and contribute to an understanding of the epitaphs.
One strength is the incorporation of epigraphs from a classic Mauburnian advice book, The Flower of Royalty Blossom'd: A Manual for the Instruction of Future Monarchs.
Conflating the real and the imagined to prob-lematize both, drawing epigraphs from Brodsky, Bulgakov, Nabokov, a fictional author, a Hollywood movie, and a Bulgarian folk song, Ugresic's globe-trotting novel investigates many of her trademark issues: the migrant's plight, cultural commodifi-cation, the curse of nationalism, and the whitewashing of history.
Largely written in 1849, first published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1858, Arthur Hugh Clough's Amours de voyage begins with four epigraphs. As noted by Patrick Scott in his annotated edition of the poem, (1) the first of these, "Oh, you are sick of self-love, Malvolio, / And taste with a distempered appetite!" is a verbatim quote from Twelfth Night, I.v.96-97.
This aggregate which comprises of engravings and epigraphs is related to the Sassanid era.
Other topics include classification of ancient epigraphs into different periods using random forests, identification of annotations for circuit symbols in electrical diagrams, vehicle speed detection, gait analysis, and stereo image rectification.
John Patrick Shanley's Defiance, the second play in the trilogy that began with Doubt, the winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for Drama, has two epigraphs. The second comes from the first poem in a collection of poems by Lawrence Ferlinghetti.
(The epigraphs for his blogs, which intersperse the novel's main narrative, come from, among others, Gandhi, Guevara, Mandela and Lenin, and the reading on his bookshelves includes that singular volume The Ragged Trousered Philanthropist).
Summary: Richard Holbrooke, who died last week at age 69, loved epigraphs. They are strewn all over his writings-poems and passages from Euripides, W.H.
(9) In conversation with me an eminent Irish historian dismissed her most recent novel, The Light of Evening, as "unconscious pastiche." (10) In fact Down by the River is quite deliberate in its intertextuality, and starting with the novel's two epigraphs, it demands that readers develop a reading practice equal to this dazzling intertextuality.
Hawthorne epigraphs open various chapters, and Brown delves into the legacy of Puritanism with her final chapter on "Young Goodman Brown," whose protagonist--not coincidentally--shares her name.