epimerase


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epimerase

(ˈɛpɪməˌreɪz)
n
(Chemistry) chem an enzyme that catalyses the interconversion of epimers
Translations
epimerasa
References in periodicals archive ?
Several enzymes are involved in the incorporation of these substrates in the gluconeogenesis pathway [3]: lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) for lactate; glycerol kinase (GK) and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) for glycerol; and acyl-CoA synthetase short-chain family member 3 (ACSS3), propionyl-CoA carboxylase (PCC), methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase (MCEE), and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MUT) for propionate.
Indeed, upon insulin stimulation, myoIns is converted by a specific epimerase into its DCIns isomer.
Ohman, "Pseudomonas aeruginosa AlgG is a polymer level alginate C5-mannuronan epimerase," Journal of Bacteriology, vol.
TSTA3 Catalyzes the reactions Infections, persistent epimerase and reductase leukocytosis, mental and in GDP-D-mannose.
Skjak-Broek, "Biochemical analysis of the processive mechanism for epimerization of alginate by mannuronan C-5 epimerase AlgE4," The Biochemical Journal, vol.
Three different enzymes are involved in the metabolism of galactose include galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase (GALT), galactokinase, and epimerase (1).
Glu-1-P then enters the glycolytic pathway to generate energy, and UDP-galactose is converted back to UDP-glucose by UDP-galactose epimerase (GALE).
The conversion of MI to DCI is achieved by an epimerase enzyme and its activity was observed to correlate inversely with the degree of insulin resistance.
Those with the most promising results include inhibitors of UDP2 epimerase, Methionine tRNA synthase, the FtsZ proteins, and NDM-1 beta lactamase.
Mauge et al., "Structure and epimerase activity of anthocyanidin reductase from Vitis vinifera," Acta Crystallographica Section D, vol.
People with galactosemia, either classic galactosemia or epimerase deficiency galactosemia, have genetic mutations that decrease their levels of the key enzymes (GALT and GALE) responsible for the metabolism of a common form of dietary sugar.