epiphany

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e·piph·a·ny

 (ĭ-pĭf′ə-nē)
n. pl. e·piph·a·nies
1. Epiphany A Christian feast celebrating the manifestation of the divine nature of Jesus to the Gentiles as represented by the Magi, traditionally observed on January 6.
2. A revelatory manifestation of a divine being.
3. A sudden insight or intuitive understanding: "He had a painful epiphany about the absurdity of the job and quit" (Aleksandar Hemon).

[Middle English epiphanie, from Old French, from Late Latin epiphania, from Greek epiphaneia, manifestation, from epiphainesthai, to appear : epi-, forth; see epi- + phainein, phan-, to show; see bhā- in Indo-European roots.]

ep′i·phan′ic (ĕp′ə-făn′ĭk) adj.

epiphany

(ɪˈpɪfənɪ)
n, pl -nies
1. (Ecclesiastical Terms) the manifestation of a supernatural or divine reality
2. any moment of great or sudden revelation
[C17: via Church Latin from Greek epiphaneia an appearing, from epi- + phainein to show]
epiphanic adj

Epiphany

(ɪˈpɪfənɪ)
n, pl -nies
(Ecclesiastical Terms) a Christian festival held on Jan 6, commemorating, in the Western Church, the manifestation of Christ to the Magi and, in the Eastern Church, the baptism of Christ

e•piph•a•ny

(ɪˈpɪf ə ni)

n., pl. -nies.
1. an appearance or manifestation, esp. of a deity.
2. (cap.) a Christian festival, observed on Jan. 6, commemorating the manifestation of Christ to the gentiles in the persons of the Magi; Twelfth Day.
3. a sudden, intuitive perception of or insight into reality or the essential meaning of something, often initiated by some simple, commonplace occurrence.
4. a literary work or section of a work presenting such a moment of revelation and insight.
[1275–1325; Middle English < Late Latin epiphanīa < Late Greek epipháneia, Greek: apparition <epiphane-, s. of epiphanḗs appearing, manifest, derivative of epiphaínesthai to come into view, appear (epi- epi- + phaínesthai to appear) + -ia -y3]
ep•i•phan•ic (ˌɛp əˈfæn ɪk) e•piph′a•nous, adj.

epiphany

the appearance to man, in visible form, of a god or other supernatural being.
See also: Religion
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epiphany - a divine manifestationepiphany - a divine manifestation    
manifestation - a clear appearance; "a manifestation of great emotion"
2.epiphany - twelve days after ChristmasEpiphany - twelve days after Christmas; celebrates the visit of the three wise men to the infant Jesus
Christian holy day - a religious holiday for Christians
Jan, January - the first month of the year; begins 10 days after the winter solstice
Translations
zjevení
bogojavljenjeepifanija
epifanie

Epiphany

[ɪˈpɪfənɪ] NEpifanía f

Epiphany

[ɪˈpɪfəni] nÉpiphanie f

Epiphany

ndas Dreikönigsfest

Epiphany

[ɪˈpɪfənɪ] nEpifania
References in periodicals archive ?
Some even go through epiphanic moments of naming their child.
There are no epiphanic moments offered by these narratives but familiar introspections in relation to identity and what it means to live with its manifestation in our current reality.
$50.00--Written on the boundary of philosophy and theology and adapting Foucault's insights about the epiphanic quality of transgression, Rosemann interprets the history of Christianity in which transgression and tradition are coconstitutive from inception onward.
These are epiphanic moments, like the point in history when veils became diaphanous--another focus of the book.
KARACHI -- For all his life's work, Dr Sharif Hashmani's epiphanic moment came in a small village somewhere on the outskirts of Mardan, Khyber-Pakhtunkhwa.
Yet his writing, as Hirsch describes it, is "a fundamentally human-centered poetry," and, much more than an easily epiphanic narrative poet, Levine is a careful witness to a wide range of human experience, as evidenced, among other places, in this collection's many poems about travel in Europe and South America.
Among their topics are Homer at the Panathenaia: some possible scenarios, Hector (and) the race horse: the telescopic vision of the Iliad, Whether Odysseus and Achilles represent the best of the Achaeans in the Odyssey, Homeric iconyms and Hittite answers, and making gods present in narration through choral song and other epiphanic strategies in the Homeric Hymns to Dionysus and Apollo.
"There's a lot of epiphanic moments in my life, in this book.
We are keeping the lights on and making payroll for one reason, and one reason only--to create as many moments as possible in which a young person (or really, any sort of person) can have an epiphanic moment of recognition, of piercing empathy, of soul-shaking laughter.
In his letters Crane self-reveals as stigmatized and persecuted for his virtuosic liminality, a shamanism of marginality like that of an epiphanic saint or lonely promethean god, a role he did not, after all, choose for himself.
The poem titled 'Self Portrait' starts with the diagrammatic sketch with 7 blank pages where the reader finds only 3 words at the tail-end of the page...Here "the poet envisions in an epiphanic moment, the true nature of one's self when he wakes up, 'to see my / Self' 'discovered beyond thought'.