episcopal


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e·pis·co·pal

 (ĭ-pĭs′kə-pəl)
adj.
1. Of or relating to a bishop.
2. Of, relating to, or involving church government by bishops.
3. Episcopal Of or relating to the Episcopal Church.

[Middle English, from Late Latin episcopālis, from episcopus, bishop; see bishop.]

e·pis′co·pal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

episcopal

(ɪˈpɪskəpəl)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) of, denoting, governed by, or relating to a bishop or bishops
[C15: from Church Latin episcopālis, from episcopus bishop]
eˈpiscopally adv

Episcopal

(ɪˈpɪskəpəl)
adj
(Ecclesiastical Terms) belonging to or denoting the Episcopal Church
Eˈpiscopally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

e•pis•co•pal

(ɪˈpɪs kə pəl)

adj.
1. of or pertaining to a bishop.
2. based on or recognizing a governing order of bishops.
3. (cap.) designating the Anglican Church or some branch of it, as the Episcopal Church.
[1425–75; late Middle English < Late Latin episcopālis]
e•pis′co•pal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.Episcopal - of or pertaining to or characteristic of the Episcopal church; "the Episcopal hierarchy"; "married by an Episcopalian minister"
faith, religion, religious belief - a strong belief in a supernatural power or powers that control human destiny; "he lost his faith but not his morality"
2.episcopal - denoting or governed by or relating to a bishop or bishops
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

episcopal

[ɪˈpɪskəpəl] ADJepiscopal
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

episcopal

[ɪˈpɪskəpəl] adjépiscopal(e) Episcopal ChurchEpiscopal Church n
the Episcopal Church → l'Église épiscopalienne
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

episcopal

adjbischöflich, episkopal (spec); episcopal conferenceBischofskonferenz f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

episcopal

[ɪˈpɪskəpl] adjepiscopale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
His head, full of graceful majesty, was covered with the episcopal mitre, a headdress which gave it, in addition to the character of sovereignty, that of asceticism and evangelic meditation.
Finally the people suspected that Governor Belcher was secretly endeavoring to establish the Episcopal mode of worship in the provinces.
Indeed, he had once or twice essayed to introduce the Episcopal form of service, on the Sundays that the pulpit was vacant; but Richard was a good deal addicted to carrying things to an excess, and then there was some thing so papal in his air that the greater part of his hearers deserted him on the second Sabbath—on the third his only auditor was Ben Pump, who had all the obstinate and enlightened orthodoxy of a high churchman.
I see already his muscular calves encased in the gaiters episcopal. It was a hazardous, though maybe a gallant thing to do, since it is probable that the legend commonly received has had no small share in the growth of Strickland's reputation; for there are many who have been attracted to his art by the detestation in which they held his character or the compassion with which they regarded his death; and the son's well-meaning efforts threw a singular chill upon the father's admirers.
But the figure which most attracted the public eye, and stirred up the deepest feeling, was the Episcopal clergyman of King's Chapel, riding haughtily among the magistrates in his priestly vestments, the fitting representatives of prelacy and persecution, the union of church and state, and all those abominations which had driven the Puritans to the wilderness.
Put a shovel-hat on Gentleman Jones, and the effect would only have been eccentric; put the same covering on the head of Doctor Dulcifer, and the effect would have been strictly episcopal.
James decided that the religion of England must be Episcopal, but as the reign of James went on, England became more and more Puritan and the breach between King and people grew wide, for James was no Puritan nor was Charles after him.
From the Palace of the Tuileries, through Monseigneur and the whole Court, through the Chambers, the Tribunals of Justice, and all society (except the scarecrows), the Fancy Ball descended to the Common Executioner: who, in pursuance of the charm, was required to officiate "frizzled, powdered, in a gold-laced coat, pumps, and white silk stockings." At the gallows and the wheel--the axe was a rarity--Monsieur Paris, as it was the episcopal mode among his brother Professors of the provinces, Monsieur Orleans, and the rest, to call him, presided in this dainty dress.
Suddenly the door opened, an ecclesiastic in episcopal robes entered, followed by two guards, to whom the king waved an imperious gesture.
And many people preferred to see them alive, breathing, moving, elbowing each other in flesh and blood, in this Flemish embassy, in this Episcopal court, under the cardinal's robe, under Coppenole's jerkin, than painted, decked out, talking in verse, and, so to speak, stuffed beneath the yellow amid white tunics in which Gringoire had so ridiculously clothed them.
The authority this man, whose name was Kolory, seemed to exercise over the rest, the episcopal part he took in the Feast of Calabashes, his sleek and complacent appearance, the mystic characters which were tattooed upon his chest, and above all the mitre he frequently wore, in the shape of a towering head-dress, consisting of part of a cocoanut branch, the stalk planted uprightly on his brow, and the leaflets gathered together and passed round the temples and behind the ears, all these pointed him out as Lord Primate of Typee.
Another was discovered in them and murdered in the episcopal chair.