epoch

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ep·och

 (ĕp′ək, ē′pŏk′)
n.
1. A particular period of history, especially one considered remarkable or noteworthy.
2. A unit of geologic time that is a division of a period.
3. Astronomy An instant in time that is arbitrarily selected as a point of reference for specification of celestial coordinates.

[Medieval Latin epocha, measure of time, from Greek epokhē, a point in time; see segh- in Indo-European roots.]

epoch

(ˈiːpɒk)
n
1. a point in time beginning a new or distinctive period: the invention of nuclear weapons marked an epoch in the history of warfare.
2. a long period of time marked by some predominant or typical characteristic; era
3. (Astronomy) astronomy a precise date to which information, such as coordinates, relating to a celestial body is referred
4. (Palaeontology) geology a unit of geological time within a period during which a series of rocks is formed: the Pleistocene epoch.
5. (General Physics) physics the displacement of an oscillating or vibrating body at zero time
[C17: from New Latin epocha, from Greek epokhē cessation; related to ekhein to hold, have]
epochal adj
ˈepˌochally adv

ep•och

(ˈɛp ək; esp. Brit. ˈi pɒk)

n.
1. a period of time marked by distinctive features, noteworthy events, changed conditions, etc.: an epoch of peace.
2. the beginning of a distinctive period in the history of anything.
3. a point of time distinguished by a particular event or state of affairs; a memorable date.
4. any of several divisions of a geologic period during which a geologic series is formed.
5. an arbitrarily fixed instant of time used as a reference in giving the elements of the orbit of a celestial body.
[1605–15; < New Latin epocha < Greek epochḗ pause, check, fixed point in time]

ep·och

(ĕp′ək, ē′pŏk′)
The shortest division of geologic time, being a subdivision of a period.

epoch

- Pronounced EH-puhk, it is from Greek epokhe, "fixed point in time, stoppage," and it was first the initial point in a chronology from which succeeding years were numbered.
See also related terms for stoppage.

epoch

A time unit within a geological period.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.epoch - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or eventepoch - a period marked by distinctive character or reckoned from a fixed point or event
period, period of time, time period - an amount of time; "a time period of 30 years"; "hastened the period of time of his recovery"; "Picasso's blue period"
day - an era of existence or influence; "in the day of the dinosaurs"; "in the days of the Roman Empire"; "in the days of sailing ships"; "he was a successful pianist in his day"
historic period, age - an era of history having some distinctive feature; "we live in a litigious age"
modern era - the present or recent times
2.epoch - (astronomy) an arbitrarily fixed date that is the point in time relative to which information (as coordinates of a celestial body) is recorded
astronomy, uranology - the branch of physics that studies celestial bodies and the universe as a whole
date - the particular day, month, or year (usually according to the Gregorian calendar) that an event occurred; "he tried to memorizes all the dates for his history class"
3.epoch - a unit of geological time that is a subdivision of a period and is itself divided into ages
geologic time, geological time - the time of the physical formation and development of the earth (especially prior to human history)
geological period, period - a unit of geological time during which a system of rocks formed; "ganoid fishes swarmed during the earlier geological periods"

epoch

noun era, time, age, period, date, aeon the beginning of a major epoch in world history

epoch

noun
A particular time notable for its distinctive characteristics:
age, day, era, period, time (often used in plural).
Translations
عَصْر
epoke
aikakausiajanjaksoepookkikäännekohta
tímamót
epocha
laikmets

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] Népoca f
to mark an epochhacer época, marcar un hito

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] népoque f, ère f

epoch

nZeitalter nt (also Geol), → Epoche f

epoch

[ˈiːpɒk] n (period) → epoca, era

epoch

(ˈiːpok) , ((American) ˈepək) noun
(the start of) a particular period of history, development etc. The invention of printing marked an epoch in the history of education.
References in classic literature ?
In the earlier epochs of history, we find almost everywhere a complicated arrangement of society into various orders, a manifold gradation of social rank.
At two or three epochs, when the fortunes of the family were low, this representative of hereditary qualities had made his appearance, and caused the traditionary gossips of the town to whisper among themselves, "Here is the old Pyncheon come again
If we speculate on the condition of the vegetation during these epochs we are at least bound so far to consider existing analogies, as not to urge as absolutely necessary a luxuriant vegetation, when we see a state of things so totally different at the Cape of Good Hope.
And it may be added that the supposed danger of a gradual change being merely speculative, it would have been hardly advisable upon that speculation to establish, as a fundamental point, what would deprive several States of the convenience of having the elections for their own governments and for the national government at the same epochs.
It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way--in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only.
I suspect that not many of the strictly littoral animals, or of those which lived on naked submarine rocks, would be embedded; and those embedded in gravel or sand, would not endure to a distant epoch.
I look upon these five years as the first epoch of prosperity in the history of our town," the doctor went on after a pause.
A favorite topic with me was the popular belief in omens -- a belief which, at this one epoch of my life, I was almost seriously disposed to defend.
Of his life, career, achievements, and end nothing is preserved for the edification of his young successors in the fleet of to-day - nothing but this phrase, which, sailor-like in the simplicity of personal sentiment and strength of graphic expression, embodies the spirit of the epoch.
In fact I lived over in my small way the epoch of the eighteenth century in which these curious frauds found polite acceptance all over Europe, and I think yet that they were really worthier of acceptance than most of the artificialities that then passed for poetry.
If I might make so bold as to defend that extravagant conception, Mr Merdle, I would hint that it originated after the Railroad-share epoch, in the times of a certain Irish bank, and of one or two other equally laudable enterprises.
With this the first epoch in my love story comes to an end.